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Robert Sandilands Primary School & Nursery

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Robert Sandilands Primary School, Speen was opened in 1967 and named after a vicar of Speen who started a scheme to give free education to needy boys in the area. We are a maintained co-educational school for children aged 3-11 years.  Currently our planned admission number is 30 however an extra Y3 class will be operating from Sept 2018 increasing that year group to upto 60 children.  The school consists of an Early Years Foundation Dept for  F1 (Nursery) and F2 (Reception) children (3-5 years), two KS1 classes (5-7 years), three lower junior classes (7-9 years) and two upper junior classes (9-11 years). The classes are chronologically grouped.

The school’s mission statement is:  ‘’ Committed to developing the unique qualities of each child.’’ Our aim is to create a secure, happy and stimulating environment that enables every child to reach their full potential.

Meeting the needs of children with SEND who are experiencing difficulties at school is the shared responsibilty of Governors, staff, parents and children. The governing body has statutory duties towards pupils with SEND.  These include ensuring that necessary provision is provided and funding, equipment and personal resources are deployed effectively.

Who to contact

Contact Name
Mrs Libby Bucknell
Contact Position
Headteacher
Telephone
01635 40318
E-mail
office@sandilands.w-berks.sch.uk
Website
Robert Sandilands Primary School & Nursery

Where to go

Name
Robert Sandilands Primary and Nursery School
Address
Digby Road
Speen
Newbury
Berkshire
Postcode
RG14 1TS

Time / Date Details

Time of day
Afternoon
Morning

Other Details

Availability

Age Ranges
1-4
4-11

Inclusion Information

Wheelchair Access

Has Provision
Yes

Childcare Information

Funded Places

3 & 4 year old funding
2 year old funding

30 Hours Extended Entitlements

Are you registered to provide 30 Hours?
No

Local Offer

Description

Robert Sandilands Primary School, Speen was opened in 1967 and named after a vicar of Speen who started a scheme to give free education to needy boys in the area. We are a maintained co-educational school for children aged 3-11 years.  Currently our planned admission number is 30 however an extra Y3 class will be operating from Sept 2018 increasing that year group to upto 60 children.  The school consists of an Early Years Foundation Dept for  F1 (Nursery) and F2 (Reception) children (3-5 years), two KS1 classes (5-7 years), three lower junior classes (7-9 years) and two upper junior classes (9-11 years). The classes are chronologically grouped.

The school’s mission statement is:  ‘’ Committed to developing the unique qualities of each child.’’ Our aim is to create a secure, happy and stimulating environment that enables every child to reach their full potential.

Meeting the needs of children with SEND who are experiencing difficulties at school is the shared responsibilty of Governors, staff, parents and children. The governing body has statutory duties towards pupils with SEND.  These include ensuring that necessary provision is provided and funding, equipment and personal resources are deployed effectively.

Local Offer Age Bands
5 to 7
7 to 11

Mainstream

1. Identification of SEND
1.1: How does the school identify children/young people with special educational needs and disabilities?

 A child or young person has SEND if they have a learning difficulty or disability which calls for special educational provision to be made for them. A child of compulsory school age or a young person has a learning difficulty or disability if they: 

(a) have a significantly greater difficulty in learning than the majority of others of the same age; or

(b) have a disability which prevents or hinders them from making use of educational facilities of a kind generally provided for others of the same age in mainstream schools 

A child under compulsory school age has special educational needs if they fall within the definition at (a) or (b) above or would so do if special educational provision was not made for them.

 

At Robert Sandilands, we look at pupil progress 3 times a year and identify children who are not reaching age related expectations. Discussions are held with class teacher, teaching assistant and SENCO and SEND assessments may be undertaken linked to literacy and maths. Children may take part in interventions if they are deemed to be appropriate and a Support and Achievement plan may be written with desired outcomes identified. Parents are kept informed during this process and Support and Achievement Plan (SAP) are shared with them.

 

If other needs are identified such as speech and language or physical difficulties, referrals are made to the appropriate agencies. 

1.2: What should I do if I think my child has SEND?

Parents concerns are always taken seriously. If a parent considers their child to have SEND they should firstly raise their concerns with the class teacher either during Parent Consultations or through a pre-arranged meeting. These concerns will then be shared with the SENCO and if appropriate the same steps as described above will be followed.

 

 

2. Support for children with special educational needs
2.1: If my child is identified as having SEND, who will oversee and plan their education programme?

It is the responsibility of the class teacher to plan for and oversee the education of every child in their class including those with SEND. The class teacher will teach and differentiate the curriculum as appropriate, as all pupils are entitled to High Quality teaching.  Additional support may be given by a TA although independent learning is also encouraged.  A TA will work with SEND pupils on their SAP targets, set by and monitored by the class teacher and SENCO. Interventions are delivered by TA’s under direction of outside professionals, SENCO and class teacher.

2.2: How will I be informed / consulted about the ways in which my child is being supported?

During Autumn and Spring terms class teachers hold parent consultation meetings. Prior to these meetings, discussions will have been held with staff delivering interventions and the SENCO to discuss children with SEND. Our school has an open door policy and parents are welcome to discuss their child at a mutually convenient time throughout the year. These discussions can be face to face or by telephone.

In conjunction with the class teacher or SENCO, parents are kept informed of any outside agency involvement and are welcome to speak with these professionals if they so wish. Reports are then forwarded to the parents for their information.

2.3: How will the school balance my child's need for support with developing their independence?

Pupils with SEND are supported in class and through intervention as required to ensure their attainment and progress reflects their potential. Class teachers plan/differentiate for opportunities for independent learning, which may include group tasks where children are supported by their peers. TA’s support SEND pupils through 1-1 support, by supporting a group they are part of and through interventions however every opportunity to promote independence and social interaction with peers is encouraged.

2.4: How will the school match / differentiate the curriculum for my child's needs?

Every class teacher differentiates the curriculum to support the range of abilities and needs within their class. This is achieved through communication with the SENCO who may have carried out SEND Assessments in Literacy and Maths and by following recommendations by outside professionals who have undertaken individual assessments.

Progress of all children is tracked termly and this information is used to identify individual children’s weaknesses and strengths. If a child is unable to access particular areas of the curriculum due to specific needs, a personalised learning plan is put in place to support their learning. 

 

2.5: What teaching strategies does the school use for children with learning difficulties, including autistic spectrum disorder, hearing impairment, visual impairment, speech and language difficulties?

Class teachers recognise that every child is an individual and strive to personalise their teaching to support every child. Support from outside agencies is sought to develop the use of resources and strategies to promote inclusion.  

Every classroom displays a visual timetable to support pupils with ASD and Speech and Language difficulties.Individual timetables are put in place when appropriate. Children may work from a task bar which supports their independence in completing tasks. Individual work stations are used to support children who on occasions struggle with the whole class environment. Movement breaks are encouraged for children who need them.

Staff vary the background colour on their interactive white board to help children with visual impairments.  Children with Speech and language difficulties will be given exposure to SAP provision to work on their Speech and Language Programme.

If a child has a learning difficulty that requires support from a specific outside agency for example the hearing consortium, resources provided to support their learning will be used.  

 

2.6: What additional staffing does the school provide from its own budget for children with SEND?

Every class in school has a TA to support the children in class and to provide individual and group interventions as appropriate to child's needs.  Additional TA’s are in place to support children with SEND who have had extensive training in a wide range of SEND. This staffing is used in addition to the High Quality Teaching provided by the class teacher which is every child’s entitlement.

2.7: What specific intervention programmes does the school offer to children with SEND and are these delivered on a one to one basis or in small groups?
Type / TitleIntervention Type
Catch up Reading Precision Teaching Daily Readers Snap Maths Draw and Talk ELSA ELKLAN One to one
Talking Partners Gross/Fine motor skills Movement/Motor Social Skills Small group
All staff carrying out these interventions have had the appropriate training. The class teacher identifies pupils who would benefit from taking part in them. Assessments are carried out to measure impact and to inform on whether or not this is the right intervention for a specific child and to adapt provision accordingly. One to one
One to one
2.8: What resources and equipment does the school provide for children with SEND?

Resources and equipment are put in place to support the individual needs of any child with SEND.  Specialised equipment may be provided by outside agencies but the school also purchases equipment and resources.  These include: coloured overlays, coloured paper and books, left and right handed pencils, sloping desks, foot support, wedge cushions, fine/gross motor skill resources, sensory resources, wobble cushions, lap and shoulder weights …

2.9: What special arrangements can be made for my child when taking examinations?

In accordance to government guidance, children with SEND can be provided with a quiet, individual area to take examinations and can have the support of a reader if required. Additional time can be applied for and movement breaks planned in. Where appropriate the school can arrange for a child to be dis-applied from taking examinations.

3. My child's progress
3.1: How will the school monitor my child's progress and how will I be involved in this?

The progress of every child is monitored on a termly basis.  This is through teacher assessment of work over a period of time and formal assessments which SEND children will complete unless deemed inappropriate by the class teacher. The progress of children is assessed through high quality marking that the children respond to. The class teacher works with different groups of pupils to support and monitor their learning and communicates with the TA about the children they have supported. The impact of interventions is monitored termly by the teacher or TA.

Parents will be informed of the progress their child is making through parent consultation meetings and reports. Parents of a child whose progress is a cause for concern may be invited in to discuss the way forward with the class teacher. We have an open door policy and parents are welcome to discuss their child’s progress at a mutually convenient time.

3.2: When my child's progress is being reviewed, how will new targets be set and how will I be involved?

Following the teacher assessing the progress of pupils, their SAP will be reviewed and where appropriate new outcomes/ targets set.If their SAP targets are linked to recommendations by outside agencies, targets may be reviewed following advice from the professionals.

Writing of SAP targets will be shared with the parent who will be provided with a copy so that these targets can be supported at home.

3.3: ln addition to the school's normal reporting arrangements, what opportunities will there be for me to discuss my child's progress with school staff?

We have an open door policy where parents are welcome to speak to any member of teaching staff regarding the progress of their child.  This can take the form of a brief discussion, arranging a mutually convenient time for an in-depth conversation or a telephone conversation. 

3.4: What arrangements does the school have for regular home to school contact?

We have an open door policy, so staff are available to discuss pupils with parents/carers. Regular news letters are sent home and a school website is available. When needed a home/school diary is provided in which staff record daily events and parents can respond and keep school informed of any circumstances that may affect their child’s day.

3.5: How can I help support my child's learning?

Parents can support their child’s learning by taking an active interest in what is going on in school. Reading any communication from school will ensure that they are well informed of events or special days that are forthcoming. Parents sign a home school agreement stating that they will read with their child at least 4 times a week and support them with their homework. If a child has a SAP parents can support their child by following the recommendations made. Parents can also seek advice from the class teacher or SENCO on ways that they can support their child in the home environment.

3.6: Does the school offer any help for parents / carers to enable them to support their child's learning, eg. training or learning events?

 Prior to transition between phases, induction meetings are held to inform parents of the changes their children may experience in school, to meet the staff and to enable them to prepare their child for the next stages of their learning.

Training is sometimes provided by outside agencies eg Advisory teachers.  Fliers advertising these are passed on to the relevant parents.

3.7: How will my child's views be sought about the help they are getting and the progress they are making?

Pupil voice is sought by staff with a focus on a specific area of learning.  Class teachers hold learning conversations with specific pupils focussing on how they feel they are progressing and the support they are receiving. Pupil’s comments are included on the end of year report. Children are expected to respond to marking in their books and reflect on their learning. 

3.8: What accredited and non accredited courses do you offer for young people with SEND?

N/A

3.9: How does the school assess the overall effectiveness of its SEN provision and how can parents / carers and young people take part in this evaluation?

The SENCO reviews the progress and attainment of individual SEND pupils on a termly basis and identifies any gaps in pupils learning.  This is then discussed with the class teacher and linked to the interventions pupils are receiving, ensuring that the support needed is being received. 

 A whole school tracking and monitoring system is in place that enables the attainment of identified groups eg SEND to be measured and compared with the cohort as a whole or other groups. SLT refer to RAISE On Line to assess effectiveness of the schools SEND provision compared to national data. A SEND questionnaire has been used to help the SENCO improve provision and support in school and all parents can access the Parent View online. Fisher Family Trust data is used by the school to predict end of key stage levels for all children with a specific reference to SEND children.

4. Support for my childs overall well being
4.1: What support is available to promote the emotional and social development of children with SEND?

The school recognises the importance of supporting children with their social and emotional development. This is overseen by the SLT and SENCO with the support of the School Pastoral manager who is available to work with pupils and their families. Monthly meetings are held by the inclusion team to discuss individual children and referrals made by staff.   

For children who need additional support, social skills groups may be set up which cover a range of elements. There are two TA’s who are ELSA trained and provide 1-1 support sessions for pupils who are referred by the class teacher in consultation with parents. Draw and Talk therapy sessions are also available. Referrals can also be made to CAMH’s if considered necessary. 

Class teachers teach PSHE which address a range of aspects appropriate to the whole class.

4.2: What support does the school put in place for children who find it difficult to conform to normal behavioural expectations and how do you support children to avoid exclusion?

The school has a clear behaviour plan and expects pupils to abide by it to ensure staff and children are safe-guarded. 

If a pupil finds it extremely difficult to conform to normal behavioural expectations, support will be put in place to help them.  Behaviour charts may be set up with incentives that are relevant to the child and behaviour prompt cards may be provided to remind a child of appropriate behaviours. If a pupil is displaying consistent behavioural difficulties, the support of the Behaviour Support Team will be sought and in consultation with them, the class teacher and the parent, a behaviour support plan may be set up.

4.3: What medical support is available in the school for children with SEND?

If a child is admitted to school with a significant medical need, training would be sought by appropriate professionals. All staff have basic first aid training, several staff have completed a three day first aid in the work place training and EYFS staff complete Paediatric First Aid. If a child has a specific medical requirement, their photograph is displayed in the staffroom with their medical requirement highlighted so that all staff are aware. 

4.4: How does the school manage the administration of medicines?

If a pupil requires medicating during the school day, the parent is required to complete a form giving consent and listing the dosage and time it needs to be administered. It is the responsibility of the parent to ensure that medication is clearly labelled with the child’s name and in date.  A record sheet is kept with the medication so that all staff know when it has been administered. Inhalers are stored in a medical box in the classroom but most medication is kept locked away. Staff  have been trained in the administration of an epi-pen.

4.5: How does the school provide help with personal care where this is needed, eg. help with toileting, eating etc?

All children are supported with their personal care if needed, in particular toileting.  In EYFS children and their parents are supported with toilet training if this has not been achieved before entry into school. Children who have a medical problem that affects their toileting are provided with access to a staff toilet where they can manage their needs privately but helped by an adult if necessary. If a child has significant physical disabilities, additional equipment would be sought from the appropriate agencies e.g. raised toilet seat or hand rail.  Special cutlery is available if needed.

5. Specialist services available / accessed by the school
5.1: What SEN support services does the school use, eg. specialist support teachers, educational psychologists, teachers for hearing impairment and visual impairment, ASD advisory teachers, behaviour support teachers etc?

The school has access to a range of SEND support service’s and seeks advice and support from them.  These services are provided by the local authority and each has their own criteria as to how their support is accessed. The SENCO has termly meetings with a member of the Cognition and Learning Support Team to discuss pupils who potentially require additional assessments and support and also meets with the Educational Psychologist.  A Speech and Language therapist carries out assessments with children in school which enables staff to follow through the recommendations that are made. The ASD advisory support teacher supports staff and pupils in school when the pupil has a diagnosis of ASD, as well as being available to discuss concerns by telephone.   Support from the Specialist Inclusion Support Service (SISS) can also be requested. In EYFS the pre-school teacher councillor can be also be called upon. Referrals are made for children who meet a strict criteria, to attend LAL in Year 5.

5.2: What should I do if I think my child needs support from one of these services?

The first point of contact should always be the class teacher who will discuss your concerns with the SENCO.  These services have strict guidelines for referral. Any concerns will be discussed with the relevant services and if appropriate a referral will be made. You may also discuss your concerns with your GP/Health visitor.

 

5.3: How are speech and language therapy, occupational therapy and physiotherapy services provided?

Speech and Language: All school aged children who are in a setting where there is a named SALT can be referred by the SENCO to their named therapist. The named SALT will Triage the referral and act appropriately. Children in F1 can attend drop in sessions at Victoria Park nursery on the 1st and 3rd Friday of each month to see the Speech and Language therapist for assessment.

OT: All children who have a statement/EHC can be referred to the Occupational Therapy service via the SPE.  Children who are going through the EHC process or are very likely to have OT recommendations as part of their statutory plan, do not need a GP referreal. The OT dept will ask the GP and Paediatrician for information before children are offered an appointment.

Children who do not have a statement should be referred to the Occupational Therapy service that is part of the RBH service and based at The Dingley Child Development Centre in Reading. They currently require a GP/medical referral. 

Physiotherapy:Children in the West Berkshire LA area, with neurodevelopmental difficulties ( for example cerebral palsy) can be referred to physiotherapy via the Single Point of Access. A GP referral is not required, but they will ask the GP and /or paediatrician for any relevant medical information prior to an appointment being offered. This ensures that  any medical issues that may be having an effect on the child’s development can be investigated prior to Physiotherapy  involvement. They do not accept referrals for children with musculoskeletal issues/joint pain/fractures/following acute injury.

5.4: What should I do if I think my child needs to be seen by a speech and language therapist, occupational therapist or physiotherapist?

Speech and Language: All school aged children who are in a setting where there is a named SALT can be referred by the SENCO to their named therapist. The named SALT will Triage the referral and act appropriately. If you think your child needs to be seen by a SALT, discuss your concerns with the class teacher who will share them with the SENCO. A referral may then be made. Children in F1 can attend drop in sessions at Victoria Park nursery on the 1st and 3rd Friday of each month to see the Speech and Language therapist for assessment.

OT: All children who have a statementcan be referred to the Occupational Therapy service via the SPE.  Children who are going through the EHC process or are very likely to have OT recommendations as part of their statutory plan, do not need a GP referral. The OT dept will ask the GP and Paediatrician for information before children are offered an appointment.

 

Children who do not have a statement should be referred to the Occupational Therapy service that is part of the RBH service and based at The Dingley Child Development Centre in Reading. They currently require a GP/medical referral. Although it is important to discuss your concerns with the school, who can write to the GP with supporting evidence, a GP appointment is required.

Physiotherapy: 

Children in the West Berkshire LA area, with neurodevelopmental difficulties ( for example cerebral palsy) can be referred to physiotherapy via the Single Point of Access. A GP referral is not required, but they will ask the GP and /or paediatrician for any relevant medical information prior to an appointment being offered. This ensures that any medical issues that may be having an effect on the child’s development can be investigated prior to Physiotherapy  involvement .They do not accept referrals for children with musculoskeletal issues/joint pain/fractures/following acute injury.  The school cannot make referrals for physiotherapy but can write a letter with supporting evidence.  A GP appointment is recommended.

5.5: What arrangements does the school have for liaison with Children's Social Care services?

The school employs a Pastoral Manager who can make links with the Children’s Social Care services.  She provides help for families and can complete a Help for Families form which links the support of all necessary agencies.  When social workers are involved with children, staff attend regular core group meetings, TAC meetings, Child Protection meetings and meet with social workers in school.

6. Training of school staff in SEND
6.1: What SEND training is provided for teachers in your school?

Child Protection for designated staff, Safeguarding, Children’s Well-being,  ASD Keeping Afloat.

6.2: What SEND training is provided for teaching assistants and other staff in your school?

TA’s are provided with a range of training opportunities to support their skills in working with pupils with SEND.  TA’s have taken part in training from the Educational Psychologist, Learning Support and Behaviour Support team.  Staff have attended training in supporting Speech and Language and OT.  Several TA’s have attended training on understanding and supporting pupils with ASD. We have staff trained to deliver ELSA and Draw and Talk. Training by the autority has been provided for TA's on Numiconn support and the Talking Partners intervention. FS staff have been trained on separation and anxiety in LAC (Looked After Children)

6.3: Do teachers have any specific qualifications in SEND?

We do not currently have any teachers with specific qualifications in SEND.

6.4: Do teaching assistants have any specific qualifications in SEND?

Whilst none of our TA's have accredited training, they do have qualifications that include ELSA, Catch up Reading, Draw and Talk, ECAT (Every Child a Talker), Snap Maths, ELKLAN, Talking Partners  and Numicon.

7. Activities outside the classroom including school trips
7.1: How do you ensure children with SEND can be included in out of school activities and trips?

All children are included in school activities and trips, regardless of SEND.  Risk assessments are carried out and appropriate staffing ratios are adhered to according to the age of the pupils, with additional adults in place if considered necessary.  The member of staff responsible for organising the trip or activity will have discussions with the venue to identify any potential difficulties and may make a pre-visit. Staff at the venue will also be made aware in advance of any SEND children that may need special provision. Any dietary needs are catered for or children asked to provide their own food and drinks. 

7.2: How do you involve parents / carers in planning the support required for their child to access activities and trips?

Parents are informed well in advance of the activity or trip providing them with the time and opportunity to raise any questions or concerns that they may have.  Conversations may be held with parents to identify practice that works at home when visiting new places and to discuss the additional support that may be required. An itinerary will be generated that can be shared with the parent. For children with dietary needs, parents may be asked to provide for their child.

 

8. Accessibility of the school environment
8.1: How accessible is the building for children with mobility difficulties / wheelchair users?

The school has a designated disabled parking space in the car park.  Access to the front of the school is via a wide level entrance and double doors.  The hall has a ramp and hand rail to enable wheel chair access and doors are additional width.  External doors to classrooms can be opened to permit wheel chairs.  Our Disability Equality Scheme and Accessibility plan states that we will take reasonable steps to accommodate the needs of disabled persons within the physical limitations of our building.

8.2: Have adaptations / improvements been made to the auditory and visual environment?

Interior paintwork is designed to highlight doorways for visually impaired pupils. An induction loop set up in school and would be serviced if required. 

8.3: Are there accessible changing and toilet facilities?

A disabled toilet is available with hand rails.

8.4: How do you ensure that all the school's facilities can be accessed by children with SEND?

Children with SEND are able to access all the school’s facilities due to the support they are given as required. Adaption will be made if necessary. It is clearly stated in the school’s Disability Equality Scheme and Accessibility plan that no person will be discriminated against.

8.5: How does the school communicate with parents / carers who have a disability?

School newsletters are usually emailed home fortnightly.  Copies of the newsletter and other information are posted on the school’s website. Messages are also sent by text.  Parents with a disability may receive information in a more accessible form and this would be considered if appropriate.

8.6: How does the school communicate with parents / carers whose first language is not English?

Currently all communication is in English.  Links can be made with parents of children who speak the same language so that they can provide mutual support.  Support from the EMTAS team (Ethnic Minority and Travellor Achievement) has been and will be accessed to provide interpreters on occasions when needed.

9. Preparing my child to join a new school / next stage of education
9.1: What preparation will there be for both the school and my child before he or she joins the school?

Prior to joining the school, parents with a child with SEND may meet with the head teacher, class teacher, TA and SENCO to discuss their child’s specific needs. In EYFS  home visits and school settings will be undertaken. The child will have opportunities to visit the school with support from the previous setting if deemed necessary. Photo books can be made available, extra visits arranged and a staggered entry to the new class can be set up. If a child has existing support from outside agencies, reports (if available) will be read and recommendations put in place.  Meetings may also be held between staff and outside support agencies.

9.2: How will my child be prepared to move on to the next stage within school, e.g. class or key stage?

The class teachers and TA’s will liaise to ensure a smooth transition.  A photo book can be set up displaying staff and the environment, extra visits to the new environment will be put in place and the receiving TA may spend time with a particular child in their familiar learning environment. Meetings between staff and parents may be arranged.

9.3: How will my child be prepared to move on to his or her next school?

If a child has a statement/EHC, the SENCO from the receiving secondary school will be invited to attend the Year 6 annual review. The SENCO from the receiving secondary school may also visit identified pupils in school. For all SEND children, individual transition needs are considered. Staff from the receiving schools meet all children moving to their school and class teachers discuss any individual pupils needs. Additional visits can be arranged with children supported by their TA if necessary and photo books can be prepared to familiarise them with new staff and learning environment. The child’s confidential records that include any reports and SAP’s are forwarded to the receiving school.

9.4: How will you support a new school to prepare for my child?

When transferring to secondary school, staff will meet with receiving staff and discuss any specific needs of the pupils.  Staff may communicate with receiving schools via telephone or email if children are transferring to new schools prior to Year 6. Confidential files and reports are shared in advance so that the new school is aware of outside agency involvement and can act on recommendations.

9.5: What information will be provided to my child's new school?

When transferring to secondary school, staff will meet with receiving staff and discuss any specific needs of the pupils.  Staff may communicate with receiving schools via telephone or email if children are transferring to new schools prior to Year 6. Confidential files and reports are shared in advance so that the new school is aware of outside agency involvement and can act on recommendations.

9.6: How will the school prepare my child for the transition to further education or employment?

N/A

10. Who can I contact to discuss my child?
10.1: Who would be my first point of contact if I want to discuss something about my child or if I am worried?

The first point of contact should always be the class teacher but additional staff who work with a specific child can be available to discuss concerns.

10.2: Does the school offer any specific support for parents / carers and families (such as Family Support Workers?)

The school has Pastoral Manager who works three days a week. She is available to support parents/carers and families as required.

10.3: What arrangements does the school have for signposting parents / carers to external agencies which can offer support, such as voluntary agencies?

The Pastoral Manager and SENCO can signpost parents/carers to agencies that can give  them the support they require.  If support meetings are available by outside agencies, fliers are sent home to the appropriate families

10.4: What arrangements does the school have for feedback from parents, including compliments and complaints?

School welcomes complimentary comments and celebrates these, but also welcomes reasonable recommendations to improve our provision

In the atmosphere of mutual understanding and co-operation, which the school aims to foster, it is hoped that disagreements about the delivery of the curriculum will be minimal. Differences of opinion may occur from time to time. Informal discussions can be held with the staff and/or the Headteacher.  Parents with complaints that we cannot resolve informally are entitled to refer the matter to the Governing Body of the school and ultimately the Local Educational Authority. 

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