Spurcroft Primary School

Spurcroft Primary School & Nursery

‘The future begins here…’

The school’s mantra is ‘The future begins here…’. This was reviewed with parents, staff, Governing board and children in 2019 and represents the school’s ethos. Spurcroft Primary School and Nursery is committed to preparing children for their future.

We focus on high standards of teaching, an engaging and wide ranging curriculum and developing a thriving relationship with the community.

At Spurcroft, we are building the skills and teaching the values that young people will need to take them forward. We are dedicated to developing children to be ready for their future, in collaboration with families and the community.

Spurcroft Primary School and Nursery is a larger than average primary school set within large playing fields. The school has expanded over time and we currently have 490 children on roll and most classes are single year groups.

It is set at the bottom of Spurcroft Road off the Moors in Thatcham and has a mixed catchment area and population. Although most children in the school are of White British origin there are over 16 different ethnicities represented. The number of children who are eligible for the Pupil Premium Grant is approximately in line with the national average. The number on the SEND register is akin to the national average with 71% of children having a need that is not Cognition and Learning. The Inclusion Team Leader is a specialist Teacher in Specific Learning Difficulties/Dyslexia.

The school is not affiliated to any faith but has links with the local Thatcham churches and aims to give children an understanding of spirituality through a variety of collective worship experiences. 

Every child has the right to join an after school club of which we have many. In recent years we have included amongst others a clay cub, chess club, and an art club. Sports clubs are very popular and have offered a range of sports from football and netball to fencing and mini golf. 

Every child from year 1 has the opportunity to join the School Choir which regularly performs at the Junior Music Festival in Basingstoke and has taken part in singing opportunities at the Royal Albert Hall and the O2. Peripatetic teachers come into school to teach the violin and guitar and there is also the opportunity to have music tuition from Maestros in brass or piano.

Each year there are three performances involving children from Year 2, Year 4 and Year 6. In addition each class performs an assembly twice a year to the school and parents. In Year 4 and Year 6 children go on residential excursions that link to the curriculum. Y4 stay at The Pioneer Centre for 2 nights and take part in a range of activities including trekking, canoeing and abseiling. In Year 6 pupils visit Sealyham where they stay for 4 nights and take part in many outdoor activities. These include surfing, coasteering and climbing.

Our bespoke school curriculum is carefully designed to cover the requirements of the 2014 National Curriculum in a personalised way. This ensures every child is challenged and valued equally whilst their needs are catered for within given resources and staff. A child with Special Educational Needs will be assessed as and when deemed necessary after consultation with the parents, Head teacher, the class teacher and the Inclusion Team Leader. We operate an open door policy and encourage parents/carers to work with the school. Class teachers are usually the primary link for parents/carers and this connection is encouraged through activities such as sending pupils’ English and Maths books regularly. In addition the open door policy allows parents to, whenever possible, talk with the Inclusion Team Leader or email important information.

We have a small but dedicated and thriving ELSA team who deal with helping children in a variety of ways some of which may be anger management, self-esteem and recognising emotions. We have a team of Teaching Assistants  for Learning Support who are skilled and very experienced.  We expect every child including those with a SEN or disability to take part fully in school events and to achieve the best they can be so they can become confident young people who will be valued members of their community.

Who to contact

Contact Position
School office
Telephone
01635 871541
E-mail
office@spurcroft.w-berks.sch.uk
Website
Spurcroft Primary School

Where to go

Name
Spurcroft Primary School and Nursery
Address
Spurcroft Road
Thatcham
Berkshire
Postcode
RG19 3XX

Time / Date Details

Time of day
Afternoon
Morning

Inclusion Information

Wheelchair Access

Has Provision
Yes
Details
All our school buildings are accessible for wheelchair users.

Special Needs

Has Provision
Yes
Experience with
General Special Needs
Genetic conditions
Global Development Delay
Food Allergies
Heart conditions
Bowel disfunction
Hyperactivity
Autism
Hayfever
Allergies
Learning difficulties
Developmental delay
Wheelchair user
Dietary needs
Dispraxia
Communication problems
Co-ordination
Toileting Assistance
Vegetarian
Delayed speech
Epilepsy
Feeding assistance
Dyslexia
Dyspraxia
Eczema
Emotional needs
Severe anxiety
SENCO
Serious allergy
Social & Emotional needs
Asthma
Skin condition
Challenging Behaviour
Memory difficulties
Autistic spectrum
Can admit children with special needs
Milk intolerance
Mobiltiy difficulties
Speech and Language difficultie
Language impairment
Brain damage
Behavioural problems
Aspergers syndrome
Partially sighted
Hearing Impairment
ADD & Hyperactivity
Physical impairment
Social development impairment
Premature child
Downs syndrome
Diabetes
Motor impairment
Muscular dystrophy
ADHD
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
Details
We are an inclusive school dedicated to giving every child whatever their additional need the education they need.

Cultural Provisions

Has Provision
Yes

Childcare Information

Funded Places

3 & 4 year old funding

30 Hours Extended Entitlements

Are you intending to provide 30 Hours?
Yes
Are you registered to provide 30 Hours?
Yes

Local Offer

Local Offer Age Bands
5 to 7
7 to 11

Mainstream

1. Identification of SEND
1.1: How does the school identify children/young people with special educational needs and disabilities?

The definition of SEND is based on the Code of Practise (2014). A child or young person has SEN if they have a learning difficulty or disability which calls for special educational provision to be made for him or her. 

A child of compulsory school age or a young person has a learning difficulty or disability if he or she has a significantly greater difficulty in learning than the majority of others of the same age or has a disability which prevents or hinders him or her from making use of educational facilities of a kind generally provided for others of the same age in mainstream schools. 

Assessment and identification is very much part of our whole school practise. Regular meetings are held with all parents about their child's attainment and progress and so any additional need can be identified in a timely manner. 

1.2: What should I do if I think my child has SEND?

Firstly, talk to your class teacher. It may be they can put your mind at rest and assure you that the difficulties are normal for your child at that stage of their development. We have thorough monitoring systems for children we are concerned about that link to termly assessments and review. Should the class teacher agree that there is a difficulty, they will propose a way to attempt to overcome it or may refer you to the Inclusion Team Leader who in turn may suggest further specialist assessment or the involvement of other professionals. Following assessment and discussion with parents and staff the Inclusion Team Leader may put in place an extra intervention programme.

 We can assure you that we will communicate with you through the process and work in partnership to support the needs of your child.

2. Support for children with special educational needs
2.1: If my child is identified as having SEND, who will oversee and plan their education programme?

The Class teacher will always plan any individual learning plan with support from the Inclusion Team Leader. When a Special Need is suspected  the class teacher will, as part of their whole class teaching, differentiate their teaching effectively to take account of the child’s needs.

2.2: How will I be informed / consulted about the ways in which my child is being supported?

This will be done as part of our normal parents’ evenings and depending on the nature of the child’s difficulties there may also be Support Plan meetings. If it is agreed a child does require an individual plan, then this will be shared and agreed with parents.

2.3: How will the school balance my child's need for support with developing their independence?

Primarily by providing work differentiated to their precise needs so they can access it with minimal support and by ensuring that the learning builds on, or reinforces, previous knowledge. Support will also include teaching children strategies for independence so that they learn how to cope with specific difficulties going forward.

2.4: How will the school match / differentiate the curriculum for my child's needs?

We have a rigorous system of monitoring and assessment so that the class teacher knows where each child is their learning. This enables effective differentiation. If appropriate focused observations of individual pupils by the Inclusion Team leader will offer advice and support to class teachers. The school will also follow closely advice from specialist services, e.g. – Speech and Language,  to ensure suggested strategies are put into place, monitored and reviewed.

2.5: What teaching strategies does the school use for children with learning difficulties, including autistic spectrum disorder, hearing impairment, visual impairment, speech and language difficulties?

Various strategies are used depending on the difficulty and impact it has on the child’s learning and progress. Common to all classrooms are visual timetables, interactive whiteboards/projectors and a constant wireless internet connection. All teaching and support staff are trained in positive behaviour management and regularly receive training in common SEND needs. All our classrooms are accessible, well lit and carpeted and we have a wide range of specialist resources to support children in Maths and English. The school works closely with the hearing and visual impairment services to ensure access to specialist equipment. All Early Years staff receive training on Speech and Language and KS1 and 2 have  a number of support staff who are further trained in supporting children with a specific learning difficulty, Occupational Therapy. and Speech Language and Communication Needs. 

Teaching Assistants  are used flexibly across the school to support children with a range of needs. This includes small group phonic teaching, one to one tuition, small group teaching and some computer based intervention.

2.6: What additional staffing does the school provide from its own budget for children with SEND?

The TA teams are partly funded by the SEND budget, this includes two ELSAs. Learning Support TAs work with children with more specific difficulties who need individual tuition. ELSAs work with a variety of children across the school either 1:1 or in small groups on social skills, anger management or coping with significant life events that may happen such as divorce or bereavement. 

2.8: What resources and equipment does the school provide for children with SEND?

Following professional’s advice, equipment such as sloping desk tops, sit and move cushions and small sensory devices can be provided by the school. We have Occupational Therapy (OT) equipment for children with OT needs. Some children also have access to IT hardware (e.g. laptops to support their learning) and software which can by arrangement be set up at home.

2.9: What special arrangements can be made for my child when taking examinations?

Arrangements for children at the end of year 6 are based on what has been common practise. Therefore children in every year group may benefit from special arrangements during other examinations (e.g. optional SATS) as well as in class. These are designed to help each individual child fulfil their potential when sitting statutory tests. These may include: extra time, exercise breaks or a scribe – whatever it is it must be part of the child’s normal practise. The specific arrangements for year 6 SATS are discussed early in year 6 by Senior Leadership Team, the KS2 Team Leader and the Inclusion Team Leader.  

3. My child's progress
3.1: How will the school monitor my child's progress and how will I be involved in this?

The school’s normal termly assessment programme along with the assessment from any interventions will be used to monitor and measure the child’s progress. These results will be shared with parents/carers at parents’ evenings and at support meetings. If your child receives extra support or has an individual plan then this will also be discussed with you before the support begins and after to review progress.

3.2: When my child's progress is being reviewed, how will new targets be set and how will I be involved?

Support and Achievement Plans will set specific and time limited targets and these will be discussed with the parents and often the child.  Targets will usually build on previous targets or may address other concerns depending on the child’s needs. We believe strongly that parents, children and staff should have a clear understanding of the plan so that everyone takes responsibility for what needs to be done in order for progress to be achieved.

3.3: ln addition to the school's normal reporting arrangements, what opportunities will there be for me to discuss my child's progress with school staff?

We have an open door policy with easy access to the class teacher though we would ask that conversations are had at the end of day. The Inclusion Team Leader is on her non contact days days for short conversations and can also be contacted by phone or email. More complex issues may need a more formal meeting involving the class teacher and the Inclusion Team Leader.

3.4: What arrangements does the school have for regular home to school contact?

The school has systems in place for all children for regular home – school contact. For example, English and Maths books are sent home once a term for parents to see with an opportunity to comment on their child’s work.  For some children, we have in place a home school book which goes home daily and is a point of contact between the home and school for both parents and school. This depends on the need of the child. The school will also keep parents/carers up to date with the learning through regular updates to the website, school twitter account and text messages.

3.5: How can I help support my child's learning?

Home learning for children with a SpLD is essential as daily practise on specific skills is the most effective way to progress. Ten minutes a day is far more effective than an hour on Saturday afternoon. Parents can also support by engaging with school and outside agencies attending any meetings about their child. Ensuring your child has completed their homework and is organised each day with the correct kit, uniform, etc is essential. 

3.6: Does the school offer any help for parents / carers to enable them to support their child's learning, eg. training or learning events?

The school holds curriculum evenings and parent forums on specific subjects such as reading or phonics. These will arise according to need. 

3.7: How will my child's views be sought about the help they are getting and the progress they are making?

Targets will be shared with the child in an appropriate and age relevant manner and learning intentions made clear so they know exactly what they will be working towards both short term and the bigger picture. For children with more complex difficulties where many agencies may be involved, meetings will be run under the principle of the child being the centre of the process – taking account of their views and feelings as well as the parents and the other professionals.

All children in Key Stage 1 and 2 bring their Maths and Literacy books home once a term to share progress. Children in EYFS are continually assessed using computer based software which allows and encourages parents to share the children’s learning experiences frequently through a secure sight.

3.8: What accredited and non accredited courses do you offer for young people with SEND?

n/a

3.9: How does the school assess the overall effectiveness of its SEN provision and how can parents / carers and young people take part in this evaluation?

Once a year we ask parents to complete a questionnaire for the whole school were concerns can be raised. The results of these are used to inform evaluation by Senior Leadership Team and the Governing Board.  

Assessment data is used to monitor underachievement and children who are causing concern are highlighted. Support strategies are then put into place by the class teacher with the support if needed of the Inclusion Team Leader. 

This information is tracked and analysed by staff and used to inform governors and whole school self evaluation. Any ongoing trends are prioritised in the school development plan and these are regularly evaluated by the Inclusion Team Leader with the support of the Headteacher and SEND link governor. Progress is also regularly monitored by the Governor Standards Committee and used to inform strategic decisions.

4. Support for my childs overall well being
4.1: What support is available to promote the emotional and social development of children with SEND?

We have a small team of Emotional Literacy Support Assistants who are specially trained in this area. They offer tailored support for children in areas such as anxiety, social skills and anger management.

Our extensive extracurricular provision offers plenty of chances for children to be included socially and this is supplemented by our out of hours club (Wild Wood Club) which many children with SpLD benefit from. Staff working at the club are trained school employees and some also work in school. This allows them to make good relationships with vulnerable children and the cross over between the two provisions is a strength.

4.2: What support does the school put in place for children who find it difficult to conform to normal behavioural expectations and how do you support children to avoid exclusion?

Systems and processes are followed consistently by all staff.  We have a rigorous Behaviour Management Policy.    This enables us to support children in the classroom, and on the playground. We follow advice from the Behaviour Intervention Team where appropriate and will take advice from other professionals where we feel it is necessary. This may include individual arrangements or specialist group provision aimed at specific areas, e.g. – anger management.

Children who require individual support may have a personalised plan. In addition they and others may also have a Pupil Passport which gives a snapshot of the pupil’s needs and how they can be best managed. This is particularly useful for new or temporary staff who may not otherwise have a good understanding of the child’s needs.

Working proactively we monitor behaviour trends and make adaptations to provision where needed.

4.3: What medical support is available in the school for children with SEND?

Medication such as epipens and inhalers are managed centrally in school and are collected from the medical room as required if a child/class goes out of school. The majority of staff are trained in the use of epipens. Other medical support is given as needed. For example we have had training from the paediatric diabetic nurse when we had a child in school with diabetes and members of the support and teaching staff were trained. We will always follow advice from professionals and work with them and parents to support children’s needs.

4.4: How does the school manage the administration of medicines?

Parents will need to fill in a form and hand the medicine to the office staff. This is then kept in the medical room and administered according to the instructions given by the parent/recorded on the prescription packaging. We encourage the children to remember to come to the office themselves but also realise that this is not always easy and the office staff monitor and support this process.

4.5: How does the school provide help with personal care where this is needed, eg. help with toileting, eating etc?

This would be entirely on a child by child basis following advice from professionals. In Early Years there is a specialist changing area and resources to support the changing of children in the unit. Where this is a regular requirement, risk assessments and personal plans will be recorded and monitored.

5. Specialist services available / accessed by the school
5.1: What SEN support services does the school use, eg. specialist support teachers, educational psychologists, teachers for hearing impairment and visual impairment, ASD advisory teachers, behaviour support teachers etc?

We have consistent support from the West Berkshire Cognition and Learning Team and they are usually our first contact when we require more specialist input. We can also apply for support from the Educational Psychology Service and the ASD advisory teachers to support individual children who are causing concern. Children who are pre statutory school age may be supported by the Early Development and Inclusion Team when they come to us. Teachers from the Sensory Consortium come into school as required for children whoa re hearing or visually impaired.

 

 

5.2: What should I do if I think my child needs support from one of these services?

All these services set criteria for referrals. Talk to the class teacher and/or Inclusion Team Leader for advice.

5.3: How are speech and language therapy, occupational therapy and physiotherapy services provided?

These are services from outside the school and have set criteria for provision.We work closely with the Speech and Language Therapist assigned to the school who supports and advises our staff who work with specific children. We have a daily Occupational Therapy club run by TAs who work with invited children on their specific needs. 

5.4: What should I do if I think my child needs to be seen by a speech and language therapist, occupational therapist or physiotherapist?

In the first instance talk to your child’s class teacher to see if thye have the same concerns. The CYPIT website has excellent advice in their toolkits. The school cannot refer to Occupational therapy unless the child in in receipt of an EHCP. 

5.5: What arrangements does the school have for liaison with Children's Social Care services?

Liaison is on a case by case basis. There are a number of staff who may liaise with Children's Services and become a key person for that family should further input be necessary. 

6. Training of school staff in SEND
6.1: What SEND training is provided for teachers in your school?

Training takes place as part of induction for teachers and can be delivered as INSETs or staff meetings as deemed appropriate by the Leadership Team in the school. We also send teachers on courses provided by West Berkshire and externally for training on specific needs as deemed necessary.

6.2: What SEND training is provided for teaching assistants and other staff in your school?

Training is given in house by the ELSAs,  the Inclusion Team Leader and other staff in strategies for teaching SpLD, managing children’s behaviour and subject specific support. Teaching assistants are also invited to attend specific INSETs as required.

6.3: Do teachers have any specific qualifications in SEND?

The Inclusion Team Leader is a qualified SEND teacher and assessor in Specific leaning Difficulties. (dyslexia)

6.4: Do teaching assistants have any specific qualifications in SEND?

No

7. Activities outside the classroom including school trips
7.1: How do you ensure children with SEND can be included in out of school activities and trips?

By putting in place risk assessments where necessary, ensuring a good ratio of adults and children and planning for their needs as appropriate. It very much depends on the need of the child. For some children it may be as simple as being in a group of three on a trip instead of a group of six, it may be ensuring that the child is with his class teacher’s group and not a parent helper. For children with complex needs we may ask a parent/carer to come on the trip to support the child and/or make contact with the destination to ensure suitable arrangements are in place.

Analysis of inclusion also helps the school to evaluate what’s on offer and target activities if a gap in take up is identified.

7.2: How do you involve parents / carers in planning the support required for their child to access activities and trips?

This will be discussed at Support Plan Meetings. We will listen to parents concerns and advise as required. If appropriate an individual risk assessment will be completed and shared with parents.

 

 

8. Accessibility of the school environment
8.1: How accessible is the building for children with mobility difficulties / wheelchair users?

Both  buildings are wheel chair friendly and our two storey  building has a lift for the use of mobility impaired children and adults.There is a disabled toilet in both buildings. 

8.2: Have adaptations / improvements been made to the auditory and visual environment?

The school building is relatively modern and most classrooms are carpeted to enhance the experience for our Hearing Impaired pupils.  As a modern building all classrooms are bright with plenty of natural light. Specialist amplification equipment for hearing impaired children can be provided where appropriate.

8.3: Are there accessible changing and toilet facilities?

We have a disabled toilet in each building for adults and specific children by arrangement and after consultation with the Inclusion Team Leader and the head teacher. All areas of the school are fully accessible by all adults and children with disabilities. As a Primary school we have no separate changing facilities but, if there is a need, then arrangements can be made for children to change away from the classroom. 

 

8.4: How do you ensure that all the school's facilities can be accessed by children with SEND?

As above

8.5: How does the school communicate with parents / carers who have a disability?

Please see the answer above 3.1 – 3.4

8.6: How does the school communicate with parents / carers whose first language is not English?

We have access to the Ethnic Minority and Traveller Service who can provide appropriate support.

9. Preparing my child to join a new school / next stage of education
9.1: What preparation will there be for both the school and my child before he or she joins the school?

If your child is joining us from the start of their school career in our Early Years Foundation Stage, then you will be part of our normal preparation which involves a home visit where you will have the chance to raise any concerns. From this, together we will decide if they need more visits before starting. Depending on need we may agree to a staggered start, gradually building up the day.

If your child is joining us from another school, then there will be a chance to meet with the Inclusion Team Leader at the initial visit if requested and depending on need a staggered transition may be agreed.

9.2: How will my child be prepared to move on to the next stage within school, e.g. class or key stage?

Transition books are the norm for children who are anxious about transition. These are personalised and contain pictures of their new teacher, classroom and other staff or areas that are pertinent to them.  Some children, depending on need, will be told who their new teacher is some weeks in advance of the end of the previous term so they can begin to build a relationship with them by going to show them their work or encouraging them to share news. Depending on need, some children may require continued support at the beginning of the next term in their new class.

9.3: How will my child be prepared to move on to his or her next school?

Similarly to above with a transition book. Depending on need and in consultation with the new school’s SENCo, there may be extra visits to the next school. The Inclusion Team Leader will support the parents in interviews and visits to the school if this is agreed to be appropriate.

9.4: How will you support a new school to prepare for my child?

By consultation and liaison with the SENCo.

 

 

9.5: What information will be provided to my child's new school?

All the information we have will be shared. This usually goes by post to the new school or by email. In some cases a telephone call may be deemed appropriate. 

9.6: How will the school prepare my child for the transition to further education or employment?

n/a

10. Who can I contact to discuss my child?
10.1: Who would be my first point of contact if I want to discuss something about my child or if I am worried?

First point of contact is always the class teacher. This may be with the Inclusion Team Leader depending on the complexity of the worry.

10.2: Does the school offer any specific support for parents / carers and families (such as Family Support Workers?)

We have a family support assistant who will work with parents on supporting common difficulties in families.  We can also signpost to external agencies. 

10.3: What arrangements does the school have for signposting parents / carers to external agencies which can offer support, such as voluntary agencies?

We are able to signpost families to suitable support services. 

10.4: What arrangements does the school have for feedback from parents, including compliments and complaints?

We have a robust complaints procedure and operate an open door policy where possible. We would rather parents spoke to us early with any concerns than let them grow. We are always happy to receive compliments in writing or via email. This is great evidence to demonstrate how well we are doing.

West Berkshire Council do not promote or endorse any of the services listed in this Directory. For more information on this please read our disclaimer.

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