Springfield Primary School

Springfield School is larger than average. A very large majority of the pupils are White British. A below-average proportion of pupils are identified as having special educational needs and/or disabilities, including those with a statement of special educational needs. Their needs mainly relate to speech, language and social communication difficulties, moderate and specific learning difficulties, emotional behavioural difficulties and hearing-impairment. Very few of the pupils are known to be eligible for free school meals. Children in the Early Years Foundation Stage are provided for in one Early Years Foundation Stage Unit. The school runs a breakfast and after-school club.

At Springfield we believe that everyone who is part of our community is special. We want all children to receive an education of the highest quality to develop to their full potential not only intellectually, but also creatively, spiritually and morally.

We strive to provide a caring and stimulating environment to lay the foundations for all our children to take an active part in adult life, promoting attitudes of mutual respect and responsibility.

Who to contact

Telephone
0118 942 1797
E-mail
office@springfieldprimary.org
Website
Springfield Primary School

Where to go

Name
Springfield Primary School
Address
Barton Road
Tilehurst
Reading
Berkshire
Postcode
RG31 5NJ

Inclusion Information

Wheelchair Access

Has Provision
Yes

Special Needs

Has Provision
Yes

Dietary Needs

Has Provision
Yes

Cultural Provisions

Has Provision
Yes

Childcare Information

Vacancies

Immediate vacancies
Date updated
04/12/2019
Vacancy range(s)
Vacancy range(s)
PlacesStart AgeEnd Age
0 3 5

Funded Places

3 & 4 year old funding
2 year old funding

30 Hours Extended Entitlements

Are you intending to provide 30 Hours?
Yes
Are you registered to provide 30 Hours?
Yes
30 Hour Partner Summary
The children that are entitled to funded places are in the nursery, which is part of our Foundation Unit.

Waiting List

Do you have a waiting list?
Yes

Local Offer

Description

Springfield School is larger than average. A very large majority of the pupils are White British. A below-average proportion of pupils are identified as having special educational needs and/or disabilities, including those with a statement of special educational needs. Their needs mainly relate to speech, language and social communication difficulties, moderate and specific learning difficulties, emotional behavioural difficulties and hearing-impairment. Very few of the pupils are known to be eligible for free school meals. Children in the Early Years Foundation Stage are provided for in one Early Years Foundation Stage Unit. The school runs a breakfast and after-school club.

At Springfield we believe that everyone who is part of our community is special. We want all children to receive an education of the highest quality to develop to their full potential not only intellectually, but also creatively, spiritually and morally.

We strive to provide a caring and stimulating environment to lay the foundations for all our children to take an active part in adult life, promoting attitudes of mutual respect and responsibility.

Local Offer Age Bands
5 to 7
7 to 11

Mainstream

1. Identification of SEND
1.1: How does the school identify children/young people with special educational needs and disabilities?

Initial concerns about any special educational needs usually come from parents or from staff working with the child.  Staff are experienced in identifying children with a range of special educational needs.  Occasionally, children will join us with their needs already identified.  For example, they may already be accessing speech and language therapists.

1.2: What should I do if I think my child has SEND?

You should first discuss this with your child’s teacher who will, if necessary, seek the advice of the school’s Special Educational Needs Coordinator (SENCo).

 

 

 

2. Support for children with special educational needs
2.1: If my child is identified as having SEND, who will oversee and plan their education programme?

Your child’s class teacher will have responsibility for this, through consultation with the SENCo.

 

2.2: How will I be informed / consulted about the ways in which my child is being supported?

You will have opportunities during parent consultations to discuss this.  Further meetings may be arranged on request. You will be given an opportunity during these meetings to input into the planning process for your child.

 

2.3: How will the school balance my child's need for support with developing their independence?

Our aim is to facilitate the development of children’s life skills, whatever their needs are.  We encourage all children to take an active role in their own learning and provide them with a range of learning opportunities involving challenge at their own level.

 

2.4: How will the school match / differentiate the curriculum for my child's needs?

All staff are well trained to deliver a curriculum that is accessible to all. Planning will reflect your child’s next steps and progress will be assessed and reviewed regularly to ensure that teaching is impacting on progress.

2.5: What teaching strategies does the school use for children with learning difficulties, including autistic spectrum disorder, hearing impairment, visual impairment, speech and language difficulties?

The school uses a range of strategies to support children with special or additional needs.  Each child is observed and assessed to ensure that the provision is appropriate and effective.  For example, a child with ASD may work better with a designated quiet area within the classroom, a hearing impaired child might benefit from sitting near to the teacher.  Each child’s individual strengths and areas of difficulty will be assessed and appropriate strategies put in place.

2.6: What additional staffing does the school provide from its own budget for children with SEND?

We will always endeavour, within the constraints of our budget, to meet children’s special and additional needs.

2.7: What specific intervention programmes does the school offer to children with SEND and are these delivered on a one to one basis or in small groups?
Type / TitleIntervention Type
Structured reading sessions One to one
Phonics (Read Write Inc.) Small group
Snap on 2 Maths One to one
Handwriting intervention
Precision teaching One to one
Targeted spelling intervention
2.8: What resources and equipment does the school provide for children with SEND?

This depends very much on the needs of the child.  We provide a range of concrete and tactile learning resources for children across the school. Examples include adapted learning resources e.g. high interest books for children with a lower reading age, resources to aid motor skills and support physical development e.g. pencil grips, adapted scissors.

2.9: What special arrangements can be made for my child when taking examinations?

Children with special or additional needs can sometimes qualify for special access arrangements for taking their SATs.  These arrangements could include providing readers for maths tests, providing scribes for writing tasks or additional time.  If school staff feel that your child will benefit from special arrangements such as these they will be assessed to determine whether they meet the criteria set out in Government guidance.

3. My child's progress
3.1: How will the school monitor my child's progress and how will I be involved in this?

All children’s progress at Springfield is monitored half termly by the class teacher.  All children are set targets and, should they not be making expected progress, they will be highlighted for review and provision will be modified accordingly.  For children with support and achievement plans, these will be shared during parents consultations and you will have an opportunity to input into this process at these meetings.

3.2: When my child's progress is being reviewed, how will new targets be set and how will I be involved?

You will have updates of your child’s progress during parents consultations.  Teaching staff may contact you if they are concerned about your child’s progress. Should you have any concerns you should always contact your child’s class teacher.

3.3: ln addition to the school's normal reporting arrangements, what opportunities will there be for me to discuss my child's progress with school staff?

As outlined above, class teachers and the SENCo will always endeavour to be available for any meetings scheduled outside of regular parents meetings. Your child’s class teacher should be your first point of contact.

 

 

 

3.4: What arrangements does the school have for regular home to school contact?

Newsletters are sent out weekly and any general information is included there. Key stage one children have a reading record book and key stage two children have a homework diary, both of which can be used to communicate between home and school.  In exceptional circumstances, parents may receive with regular  updates either by link book or by email.  This would only happen if parents and staff agree there is a need.  Staff are generally contactable on an ad hoc basis should parents have any specific concerns they wish to discuss.

3.5: How can I help support my child's learning?

Homework and spellings will be sent home weekly. Reading books will be sent home daily. You should speak with your class teacher if you are unsure about how to help them and they will be happy to advise.

3.6: Does the school offer any help for parents / carers to enable them to support their child's learning, eg. training or learning events?

We often run information sessions for parents.  Past sessions have included information on teaching of maths, techniques for reading with your child and learning through play. We also run regular parenting courses.

3.7: How will my child's views be sought about the help they are getting and the progress they are making?

Children are regularly encouraged to reflect on their learning and progress. Children with Education, Health and Care Plans share their views prior to annual review meetings and have the opportunity to attend part of the meeting.  

 

3.8: What accredited and non accredited courses do you offer for young people with SEND?

n/a

3.9: How does the school assess the overall effectiveness of its SEN provision and how can parents / carers and young people take part in this evaluation?

The SENCo and the Leadership Team regularly analyse data to ensure that children identified as having SEN are making good progress regardless of their starting point.  If this is not the case, measures are taken to help teachers plan alternative provision.

All children have regular opportunities for self-evaluation. They are given opportunities to respond to teacher’s comments and to think about ways to improve their work.

4. Support for my childs overall well being
4.1: What support is available to promote the emotional and social development of children with SEND?

We have an ELSA (Emotional Literacy Support Assistant) team at Springfield who work with the SENCo to provide support to children to mitigate social and emotional barriers to learning.  The team comprises two qualified ELSAs, one of whom is also a  Any work carried out by the ELSA team must gain parental approval prior to starting.  Targets for this work are set with parents/ staff and reviewed at the end of an agreed period. We also have a support worker from the Emotional Health Academy in school for one afternoon a week, who offers emotional support to children on a one to one basis.

4.2: What support does the school put in place for children who find it difficult to conform to normal behavioural expectations and how do you support children to avoid exclusion?

We treat all children as individuals and always endeavour to understand the root causes of any behaviour that is a barrier to learning.  All behaviour is communication and we use positive behaviour management techniques to help individuals to express themselves is a way that is safe and allows themselves and others to learn.  This is sometimes challenging and has to be balanced with the needs of other children attending our school.

4.3: What medical support is available in the school for children with SEND?

We have a school nurse who visits regularly and have several staff members who have received paediatric first aid training. We follow guidance in individual care plans. Staff are trained annual to administer epi-pens and staff have received specific training for epilepsy and diabetes when required.

 

4.4: How does the school manage the administration of medicines?

We have procedures for administering medicines.  Any controlled medication eg. emergency epilepsy will be kept and administered according to a health care plan put in place by a medical professional.

4.5: How does the school provide help with personal care where this is needed, eg. help with toileting, eating etc?

These needs must be assessed on an individual basis and we follow our intimate care policy.  We have had children at our school who have had difficulties in this area and we have put measures in place to support them.

5. Specialist services available / accessed by the school
5.1: What SEN support services does the school use, eg. specialist support teachers, educational psychologists, teachers for hearing impairment and visual impairment, ASD advisory teachers, behaviour support teachers etc?

We have access to a range of specialist teachers and can access them accordingly depending on a child’s diagnosis and any access criteria being met. We buy into the West Berkshire Emotional Health Academy.

5.2: What should I do if I think my child needs support from one of these services?

Talk to your class teacher who will consult with the SENCo or, arrange to speak with the SENCo yourself.

5.3: How are speech and language therapy, occupational therapy and physiotherapy services provided?

The school SENCo is able to refer to Speech and language therapy and physiotherapy services.  Occupational therapy should be accessed via your GP.  Once referred, these services can be accessed in school or at specialist clinics. Occasionally groups can be set up in school.  For example, a speech and language therapist may have several children visiting for separate appointments and arrange to run group sessions. 

 

 

 

5.4: What should I do if I think my child needs to be seen by a speech and language therapist, occupational therapist or physiotherapist?

Speak to your child’s teacher in the first instance who will consult with the SENCo.  We can refer to these services but will usually want to arrange a meeting to discuss these first.  Ideally we will make any referral together.

5.5: What arrangements does the school have for liaison with Children's Social Care services?

This will be on an individual needs basis.

6. Training of school staff in SEND
6.1: What SEND training is provided for teachers in your school?

Training is offered in house from the school SENCo when a need is identified.  Occasionally staff will attend training run by the Local Authority on specific needs, or at times training might be provided by other professionals. Specific staff members have been trained for Epipens, Buccolam medication and diabetes.

6.2: What SEND training is provided for teaching assistants and other staff in your school?

Again, training is offered in house from the school SENCo when a need is identified.  Occasionally staff will attend training run by the Local Authority on specific needs. Specific staff members have been trained for Epipens, Buccolam medication and diabetes.

6.3: Do teachers have any specific qualifications in SEND?

Our SENCo has achieved the National Accreditation Award for SENCo.

6.4: Do teaching assistants have any specific qualifications in SEND?

Teaching assistants have achieved NVQ L3 qualifications which include some elements of SEN.

Our ELSAs have attended specialist training in her role.  She has also successfully completed a specialist course in supporting families.

 

 

 

 

 

7. Activities outside the classroom including school trips
7.1: How do you ensure children with SEND can be included in out of school activities and trips?

Teaching staff complete a preliminary visit to all sites to ensure access is possible.  Risk assessments are carried out as routine in line with the School's accessibility policy.

7.2: How do you involve parents / carers in planning the support required for their child to access activities and trips?

Parents may be invited to support their child if its considered beneficial for the child.  If appropriate, parents will be consulted prior to any organised trip to ensure that any necessary arrangements are made.

8. Accessibility of the school environment
8.1: How accessible is the building for children with mobility difficulties / wheelchair users?

We have ramped access to several entrances.  The school has an accessibility policy, drawin up in line with the Equalities Act, which is viewable on our website.

8.2: Have adaptations / improvements been made to the auditory and visual environment?

All classrooms have large smartboards with speaker systems.

8.3: Are there accessible changing and toilet facilities?

We have two disabled toilets.

8.4: How do you ensure that all the school's facilities can be accessed by children with SEND?

Our Accessibility Policy is drawn up in line with the Equalities Act. We assess each child’s needs and try to ensure that any reasonable adjustments are made to facilitate access.

8.5: How does the school communicate with parents / carers who have a disability?

We will always try to ensure that communication with parents can happen regardless of their own personal situations.

8.6: How does the school communicate with parents / carers whose first language is not English?

Where necessary we may ask other family members to attend meetings to help to translate.  If this is not possible we will try to find the appropriate translation support.

9. Preparing my child to join a new school / next stage of education
9.1: What preparation will there be for both the school and my child before he or she joins the school?

If your child joins in our Foundation Unit, home visits and transition sessions at school are routine.  If your child joins in another year group, every effort will be made to ensure a smooth transition.

9.2: How will my child be prepared to move on to the next stage within school, e.g. class or key stage?

We offer transition activities with next year’s teachers as routine.  However, if your child is identified as being particularly vulnerable to change they will be given support by our ELSA team who have access to a range of resources to prepare children for any change.

 

9.3: How will my child be prepared to move on to his or her next school?

Transition activities are planned as routine and we have good links with the local secondary school.  As well as routine transition activities, if your child is identified as being particularly vulnerable, additional support will be arranged.  This could include extra visits and/ or sessions on what to expect at secondary school.  Again, our ELSA team work closely with secondary settings to ensure that children are well prepared for the next stage in their education. 

9.4: How will you support a new school to prepare for my child?

Any relevant information is passed on to secondary schools.  Any relevant paperwork will be forwarded but transition meetings will also take place where any vulnerable children are highlighted and discussed in more detail.

9.5: What information will be provided to my child's new school?

Any useful assessment data and reports as well as any details of additional needs. Information on effective teaching strategies and any friendship issues/ support networks is also useful.

9.6: How will the school prepare my child for the transition to further education or employment?

n/a

10. Who can I contact to discuss my child?
10.1: Who would be my first point of contact if I want to discuss something about my child or if I am worried?

Your child’s class teacher.

10.2: Does the school offer any specific support for parents / carers and families (such as Family Support Workers?)

Our ELSA has completed a course in supporting families and runs a parenting course along with another staff member. Also, we do have access to other services that may be of use, depending on your individual circumstances.

10.3: What arrangements does the school have for signposting parents / carers to external agencies which can offer support, such as voluntary agencies?

We try to keep up to date what’s available in the local area and, where we have this information, we’re more than happy to signpost it.

10.4: What arrangements does the school have for feedback from parents, including compliments and complaints?

We send out parental questionnaires to collect parent views but welcome feedback any time.  We also have parent representatives on the Governing Body.  A formal complaints policy and procedure can be viewed via the School website. We also have a link governor.

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