Welford & Wickham CE (VA) Primary School

Coronavirus status: CLOSED

Alternative provision during COVID-19: Falkland Primary School

Welford and Wickham is a small, rural, church school, situated between Newbury and Hungerford, for children aged 4-11 years.  There are about 97 children on roll, enabling all staff to know individual children and their families well and provide a nurturing and supportive school environment. The school provides a warm and happy atmosphere and an exciting, stimulating learning environment.

This is a school where children feel safe and secure, valued and cared for and where they flourish and succeed. We believe that children should take a lead in how they learn and have ownership of how their school is shaped on a daily basis:

'Teachers should see learning through the eyes of the children ... and children should see themselves as their own teachers'

John Hattie - Visible Learning 2009

At Welford and Wickham, the children come first; children with roots and wings. We grow strong roots of academic achievement, through knowledge, skills and understanding within a broad and balanced creative curriculum which responds to the children's interests. We encourage wings of confidence and resilience with which to fly - our children go on to a wide range of secondary schools and they need to be ready for the next challenge. In a fast moving world where we are educating and preparing children for lives which we can only imagine, they will need strength of character, moral purpose and the ability to adapt rapidly to change. Simply put, your child will need to be the best that they can be. This is our vision for every child at Welford and Wickham. 

In seeking to achieve these aims, we will have regard to the views, wishes and feelings of children and their parents. We seek their views regularly. We have an open door policy to enable parents to come in at any time. The headteacher is fully involved in all aspects of school life and regularly meets with all children through tea parties and learning walks, and parent forum meetings are held at the school in addition to termly parents' meetings. We hope that the care and concern shown for our children will instil in them both self-respect and a sensitivity for the needs and values of others and the world around them.

All children are valued, respected and welcomed to the school whatever their additional educational need. We will support their learning and ensure they are fully included in all school activities, making full use of externally provided expertise where appropriate.

Children are taught inclusively with their peers through Quality First Teaching and targeted intervention. We have a carefully planned intervention programme for children who need additional help whom we identify through observation, detailed assessment and discussions with parents. We offer a range of different strategies within the lesson time to support the children. This enables them to work with an adult whom they know well and who can pre-teach and consolidate concepts taught in curriculum lessons. They may also receive intensive individual or small group input, using specific intervention programmes. (Removed specific interventions from here)

When children need specific intervention on a 1:1 or small group basis these needs will be identified and monitored through a Graduated Approach Plan (GAP) or a Support and Achievement Plan (SAP).  When identifying how these needs are to be met, parents and children will be fully involved in the discussions to identify the outcomes. These plans are reviewed regularly by the Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator (SENCo), class teacher and parents. The intervention programmes are closely monitored by the school's SENCo. They ensure that additional support is targeted appropriately and has an impact on outcomes, both in terms of standards of attainment and self-esteem.

A good rapport between pupil, teacher and parents is the corner stone for success for every child. The years that the children spend in this school are formative years, when they discover themselves, their individuality, their abilities, their interests and their strengths. Children’s talents may display themselves in many ways. We will provide a vehicle for these talents to be nurtured, encouraged, developed and praised.

Who to contact

Contact Name
Mr Paul Waller
Contact Position
SENCO
Telephone
01488 608306
E-mail
office@welford.w-berks.sch.uk
Website
https://www.welfordandwickham.org.uk/

Where to go

Name
Welford and Wickham CA (VA) Primary School
Address
Welford Road
Wickham
Newbury
Berkshire
Postcode
RG20 8HL

Childcare Information

Vacancies

Immediate vacancies
Date updated
13/11/2019
Vacancy range(s)
Vacancy range(s)
PlacesStart AgeEnd Age
7

Funded Places

Local Offer

Description

Welford and Wickham is a small, rural, church school, situated between Newbury and Hungerford, for children aged 4-11 years.  There are about 97 children on roll, enabling all staff to know individual children and their families well and provide a nurturing and supportive school environment. The school provides a warm and happy atmosphere and an exciting, stimulating learning environment.

This is a school where children feel safe and secure, valued and cared for and where they flourish and succeed. We believe that children should take a lead in how they learn and have ownership of how their school is shaped on a daily basis:

'Teachers should see learning through the eyes of the children ... and children should see themselves as their own teachers'

John Hattie - Visible Learning 2009

At Welford and Wickham, the children come first; children with roots and wings. We grow strong roots of academic achievement, through knowledge, skills and understanding within a broad and balanced creative curriculum which responds to the children's interests. We encourage wings of confidence and resilience with which to fly - our children go on to a wide range of secondary schools and they need to be ready for the next challenge. In a fast moving world where we are educating and preparing children for lives which we can only imagine, they will need strength of character, moral purpose and the ability to adapt rapidly to change. Simply put, your child will need to be the best that they can be. This is our vision for every child at Welford and Wickham. 

In seeking to achieve these aims, we will have regard to the views, wishes and feelings of children and their parents. We seek their views regularly. We have an open door policy to enable parents to come in at any time. The headteacher is fully involved in all aspects of school life and regularly meets with all children through tea parties and learning walks, and parent forum meetings are held at the school in addition to termly parents' meetings. We hope that the care and concern shown for our children will instil in them both self-respect and a sensitivity for the needs and values of others and the world around them.

All children are valued, respected and welcomed to the school whatever their additional educational need. We will support their learning and ensure they are fully included in all school activities, making full use of externally provided expertise where appropriate.

Children are taught inclusively with their peers through Quality First Teaching and targeted intervention. We have a carefully planned intervention programme for children who need additional help whom we identify through observation, detailed assessment and discussions with parents. We offer a range of different strategies within the lesson time to support the children. This enables them to work with an adult whom they know well and who can pre-teach and consolidate concepts taught in curriculum lessons. They may also receive intensive individual or small group input, using specific intervention programmes. (Removed specific interventions from here)

When children need specific intervention on a 1:1 or small group basis these needs will be identified and monitored through a Graduated Approach Plan (GAP) or a Support and Achievement Plan (SAP).  When identifying how these needs are to be met, parents and children will be fully involved in the discussions to identify the outcomes. These plans are reviewed regularly by the Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator (SENCo), class teacher and parents. The intervention programmes are closely monitored by the school's SENCo. They ensure that additional support is targeted appropriately and has an impact on outcomes, both in terms of standards of attainment and self-esteem.

A good rapport between pupil, teacher and parents is the corner stone for success for every child. The years that the children spend in this school are formative years, when they discover themselves, their individuality, their abilities, their interests and their strengths. Children’s talents may display themselves in many ways. We will provide a vehicle for these talents to be nurtured, encouraged, developed and praised.

Local Offer Age Bands
5 to 7
7 to 11

Mainstream

1. Identification of SEND
1.1: How does the school identify children/young people with special educational needs and disabilities?

School adheres to the SEN Code of Practice (2014)

A child with SEND has a significantly greater difficulty in learning than the majority of others of the same age or has a disability which prevents them from making use of educational facilities of a kind generally provided for others. Concerns may be expressed by parents, staff at the school or the child. Regular assessment is part of whole school monitoring and forms part of the co-ordinated whole school approach to identification of children with SEND.

1.2: What should I do if I think my child has SEND?

In the first instance discuss your concerns with the class teacher who will monitor, assess and review your child’s progress/development over time.

Concerns will be recorded and actions agreed. Outcomes will be reviewed in order to decide whether the child should be placed on the Special Needs Register.

2. Support for children with special educational needs
2.1: If my child is identified as having SEND, who will oversee and plan their education programme?

The class teacher will be responsible for planning school based interventions and writing their Support and Achievement plan supported by the SENCo. Views from both parents and child will be sought in the development of the plan.

2.2: How will I be informed / consulted about the ways in which my child is being supported?

Parents and the child will be involved in the discussions regarding the development of the Support and Achievement Plan and the desired outcomes of the support programme. They will be invited to review progress at termly meetings.

2.3: How will the school balance my child's need for support with developing their independence?

The role of the Teaching Assistant is to support children in class or by withdrawing individuals and small groups .They ensure that support is balanced with fostering independence because there is an expectation that the teacher will see the skills learned in supported sessions applied independently in lessons.

2.4: How will the school match / differentiate the curriculum for my child's needs?

Through the rigorous and robust assessment programme which is in place for every child in the school, the school has the knowledge of where each child is with their learning. Class teacher’s planning and timetabling takes account of different needs and has the flexibility to respond on a needs basis to an individual’s requirements.

2.5: What teaching strategies does the school use for children with learning difficulties, including autistic spectrum disorder, hearing impairment, visual impairment, speech and language difficulties?

The school takes a holistic view of each child and provides a range of teaching strategies suitable for their needs. In some cases advice is sought from external professionals to ensure our provision is appropriate whether that relates to the classroom environment, teaching aids or general classroom strategies.

2.6: What additional staffing does the school provide from its own budget for children with SEND?

When deemed appropriate we provide Teaching Assistant support. We have an Emotional Literacy Support Assistant and we also buy into the Emotional Health Academy.

2.7: What specific intervention programmes does the school offer to children with SEND and are these delivered on a one to one basis or in small groups?
Type / TitleIntervention Type
Snap Maths One to one
Structured Approach to Reading One to one
ELSA One to one
Numicon One to one
Precision Teaching One to one
ELSA One to one
Numicon Small group
Social Skills Programme Small group
Touch Typing Small group
Structured approach to writing One to one
Structured approach to writing
FFT SPRINT
2.8: What resources and equipment does the school provide for children with SEND?

With advice from appropriate professionals we will assess and identify needs and seek resources from a range of sources. Children will have access to a netbook computer within school and software for specific needs.

2.9: What special arrangements can be made for my child when taking examinations?

Every child’s needs are considered and arrangements put in place that will optimise their performance and give them equal opportunity in-line with government guidelines.

3. My child's progress
3.1: How will the school monitor my child's progress and how will I be involved in this?

The school has a yearly schedule of assessments and tracks children’s progress regularly. The Headteacher, SENCo and class teacher have termly pupil progress meetings where the impact and effectiveness of any intervention programmes are reviewed in the light of assessment data. Regular parent/teacher consultation meetings are held and the school may set up multi-professional meetings, with input from key professionals involved with the child. Parents and the child would be invited to attend and contribute to reviews.

3.2: When my child's progress is being reviewed, how will new targets be set and how will I be involved?

A draft Support and Achievement plan is written after discussion with parents and their child. It will be finalised, taking into account the views of the parent and child. The plan will be reviewed at a parent/teacher meeting, progress will be discussed and new targets agreed.

3.3: ln addition to the school's normal reporting arrangements, what opportunities will there be for me to discuss my child's progress with school staff?

The school has an ‘open door’ policy and teaching staff are available by appointment to discuss progress at any mutually convenient time.

3.4: What arrangements does the school have for regular home to school contact?

The ‘open door’ policy ensures that parents have contact with staff on a daily basis at the beginning and end of the school day. Messages may be sent to parents by email and parents are welcome to email the school office. In some instances it may be appropriate for a home/school communication book to be set up with entries made by parents/staff.

3.5: How can I help support my child's learning?

When the Support and Achievement Plan is written there will be ideas for activities that parents can undertake to support their child’s learning.

3.6: Does the school offer any help for parents / carers to enable them to support their child's learning, eg. training or learning events?

The school holds a 'Family Learning Week' and 'Look at our Learning' mornings, when children and staff talk about the curriculum, teaching methods, learning styles, resources and parents are invited to take part in learning. Through this experiential exercise parents begin to understand how their children learn and how best they can support their child.

We also hold ‘structured conversations’ each term which are managed conversations between teacher, parent and child. The aim is to raise the child's academic achievement and enhance their chances of success

West Berkshire  can offer the services of the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities Information, Advice and Support Service (SENDIASS) and through Social care Help for Families.

3.7: How will my child's views be sought about the help they are getting and the progress they are making?

The child will be at the centre of the Support and Achievement Plan. Their views will help shape the plan and their involvement in the reviews will help direct their support in the future. We actively seek and listen to the child through targeted discussion and person centred planning activities.

3.8: What accredited and non accredited courses do you offer for young people with SEND?

Not applicable

3.9: How does the school assess the overall effectiveness of its SEN provision and how can parents / carers and young people take part in this evaluation?

All stakeholders have an interest from the child, parent, staff, governors and Local Authority personnel. External bodies eg Ofsted, SIAMS report on the effectiveness of provision. The regular and rigorous assessment schedule and the impact evaluation of provision are monitored closely by the Senior Leadership Team. The Headteacher holds ‘tea parties’ with the children seeking their views and conducts learning walks throughout the school. Data shows that SEND children broadly  make progress in line and better than their peers.

4. Support for my childs overall well being
4.1: What support is available to promote the emotional and social development of children with SEND?

The school has a ‘big family’ atmosphere (quote by a pupil) and the culture and ethos of this small school fosters the development of personal growth and well-being. All children are known to all staff and the care, guidance and support given is exceptional.

The school has an Emotional Literacy Support Assistant who works with individuals or focus groups, on targeted objectives, identified by the class teacher. The ELSA is also trained in ‘Draw and Talk’ and ‘Circle of friends’  All teaching assistants deliver social skills programmes. The protocols within the bullying policy, ensures that the social needs of the children are monitored closely and children are listened to.

4.2: What support does the school put in place for children who find it difficult to conform to normal behavioural expectations and how do you support children to avoid exclusion?

The school has systems and processes in place, known and supported by all staff, to guide these children. Class teachers all follow the same behaviour management strategies as outlined in the school behaviour policy. Expectations of behaviour are made clear to the children and encouragement given to support them in making the correct choice.

4.3: What medical support is available in the school for children with SEND?

Staff have been trained in paediatric first aid and managing Type 1 Diabetes. We work closely with the school nurse and other medical professionals when appropriate.

Advice would be sought from relevant medical professionals depending on the needs of the child.

4.4: How does the school manage the administration of medicines?

Parents/carers need to fill in a consent form held in the school office. The medication will be kept in the office/ fridge or with the child if medically advised.

It will be administered as requested by a member of school staff.

4.5: How does the school provide help with personal care where this is needed, eg. help with toileting, eating etc?

Advice would be sought from the parents, relevant external professionals and the child would be supported as necessary.

5. Specialist services available / accessed by the school
5.1: What SEN support services does the school use, eg. specialist support teachers, educational psychologists, teachers for hearing impairment and visual impairment, ASD advisory teachers, behaviour support teachers etc?

The school is proactive in seeking the help and advice from expertise in the wider local educational community as well as specialist services. In addition to the personnel listed above we have referred children to the Cognition and LearningTeam, Paediatric Occupational Therapist, Child and Adolescent Mental Health services and the Children and Young Persons Integrated Therapies  team.

5.2: What should I do if I think my child needs support from one of these services?

Each service has its own criteria and route for referral. The school can refer to some of these services but it may be appropriate to ask for a GP referral. Please come into school to discuss with the SENCo and we will support parents in accessing the necessary services for their child.

5.3: How are speech and language therapy, occupational therapy and physiotherapy services provided?

Guidance from the Local Authority. School is able to access these services through the CYPIT referral system on a needs basis.

5.4: What should I do if I think my child needs to be seen by a speech and language therapist, occupational therapist or physiotherapist?
  • Contact the school for advice
  • Also possible to contact health Visitor, School Nurse or GP
  • Schools can request involvement by a Speech & Language therapist if they feel it is necessary
  • Schools can also request involvement by an Occupational therapist/Physiotherapist if the child has a statement or EHCP, otherwise it has to be done through a GP.
5.5: What arrangements does the school have for liaison with Children's Social Care services?

These are all conducted through the local authority.

6. Training of school staff in SEND
6.1: What SEND training is provided for teachers in your school?

We provide an induction programme for new teachers and non-teaching staff that reviews the SEND pupils and their needs. There is general whole school training for SEN and specific training for individual needs. Training needs are related to school data, school development plan and Continuing Professional Development of all staff. Provision is regularly made at weekly staff meetings for discussion and review of SEND pupils. Teachers are trained in the use, delivery and assessment of intervention programmes used within the school by local authority staff and external providers.

6.2: What SEND training is provided for teaching assistants and other staff in your school?

Teaching assistants/lunchtime controllers all receive training in specific needs and general SEN provision including positive behaviour management training for all staff.

6.3: Do teachers have any specific qualifications in SEND?

Our current SENCO is undertaking the National Award for Special Educational Needs Co-ordination qualification.

6.4: Do teaching assistants have any specific qualifications in SEND?

Yes. The ELSA  (emotional literacy support assistant) is trained to meet the emotional needs of the children across the school.

7. Activities outside the classroom including school trips
7.1: How do you ensure children with SEND can be included in out of school activities and trips?

The needs of the SEND pupils are carefully considered prior to any off-site activities and adaptations are made to ensure they fully participate. Teachers always make pre-visit inspections wherever possible, and carry out a risk assessment. They carefully review individual needs in the light of their experience and measures are then put in place to support the individual in the most appropriate way.

7.2: How do you involve parents / carers in planning the support required for their child to access activities and trips?

Parents are welcome to talk to the class teacher about the level of support required and may be able to accompany their own child on a day trip with the school. In order to ensure SEND pupils participate in residential trips reasonable adjustments may be made eg to the duration, the activities and the level of individual support required.

8. Accessibility of the school environment
8.1: How accessible is the building for children with mobility difficulties / wheelchair users?

There are double width doors in three areas enabling ease of access. New extensions to the school have been built with improvements to the physical environment in mind for SEND children. It should be noted that Year 5&6 are now taught upstairs.

8.2: Have adaptations / improvements been made to the auditory and visual environment?

The school has completed a building programme to improve facilities and the learning and physical environment.

8.3: Are there accessible changing and toilet facilities?

The school has a disabled toilet and handrails are fitted in two other toilets.

8.4: How do you ensure that all the school's facilities can be accessed by children with SEND?

Whilst some of our teaching spaces are on the first floor we could organise all curriculum on the ground floor when necessary. Each ground floor classroom has a dedicated computer area, toilet/cloak facilities and access to the outside areas.

8.5: How does the school communicate with parents / carers who have a disability?

Communication is the foundation of a successful relationship between home and school for any child whatever their needs. The school has an ‘open door’ policy and parents have contact with staff on a daily basis at the beginning and end of the school day. Meetings may be arranged at mutally convenient times between staff and parents Messages may be sent to parents by email and parents are welcome to email the school. In some instances it may be appropriate for a home/school communication book to be set up with entries made by parents/teachers.

General communication about upcoming events and day to day information is communicated via Parentmail (email and text, an app is also available) and via a weekly newsletter.

8.6: How does the school communicate with parents / carers whose first language is not English?

The school can access the services of the Ethnic Minority Team who can offer translation and interpretation support. Communication from school is sent via email, text and letter and staff may meet with parents to explain the content of messages.

9. Preparing my child to join a new school / next stage of education
9.1: What preparation will there be for both the school and my child before he or she joins the school?

For Reception children joining the school in September there are visits arranged during the latter part of the summer term, prior to entry. These take place over two mornings, one of which includes staying for lunch. In addition the Reception class teacher visits all pre-school settings and meets the child on familiar territory. Entry into school in September is staggered so that the main body of the school is settled, and in session, as the new entrants join. The class teacher and teaching assistant visit each Reception child in their own homes prior to their entry and parents can raise any queries or concerns they may have.

The school always welcomes visits by children, joining in other year groups, at any point in the academic year.

The ‘Friends Association’ (parent body) organises a leavers BBQ at the end of the summer term to which all new entrants are invited. The needs of the individual child will be considered in the light of these arrangements and adapted as necessary.

9.2: How will my child be prepared to move on to the next stage within school, e.g. class or key stage?

The intimate size of this school ensures that the children are known to all staff and the children are very familiar with the adults and the learning environment within the whole school. Transition days are arranged in the summer term when the children temporarily transfer to their new classrooms and experience teaching and learning in their new environment with their new teacher.

9.3: How will my child be prepared to move on to his or her next school?

Transition programmes are structured to support the individual needs of the child. Workshops are arranged to prepare children for transfer to Secondary Education through discussion and activities. Transition visits are arranged by the primary and secondary SENCos and additional visits are organised on an individual need basis.

9.4: How will you support a new school to prepare for my child?

Staff from the receiving school will visit the children and meet with staff. Transition records are passed on.

9.5: What information will be provided to my child's new school?

We pass on reports from external professionals/agencies, current SAP’s and reviews and records of attainment. Any additional information that is considered relevant to the individual’s needs is also provided.

9.6: How will the school prepare my child for the transition to further education or employment?

N/A

10. Who can I contact to discuss my child?
10.1: Who would be my first point of contact if I want to discuss something about my child or if I am worried?

The class teacher has the most knowledge of the child so would be the first person to be approached.

10.2: Does the school offer any specific support for parents / carers and families (such as Family Support Workers?)

The school has a Family Support Worker who is able to work in the home and school giving emotional and practical help and advice. There are regular ‘Parent Forum’ meetings with the Headteacher where parents meet to discuss a pre-arranged agenda.

For the parents of a child with Special Educational Needs the West Berkshire SENDIASS offers free, impartial and confidential support and advice.

 

10.3: What arrangements does the school have for signposting parents / carers to external agencies which can offer support, such as voluntary agencies?

The SENDIASS are able to signpost parents to local and wider national organisations. We have leaflets and information from these agencies in school website for parents information.

10.4: What arrangements does the school have for feedback from parents, including compliments and complaints?

Through our ’ open door’ policy  we encourage parents to share their concerns at the earliest opportunity so enabling us to discuss and resolve issues immediately.

The complaints policy lays out the formal route for making a complaint.

West Berkshire Council do not promote or endorse any of the services listed in this Directory. For more information on this please read our disclaimer.

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