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Basildon C.E. (VC) Primary School

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Basildon CE Primary School is a small village school in West Berkshire, near the border of Berkshire and Oxfordshire. We are a happy and thriving school with 5 classes and around 140 pupils aged 4-11. We consider ourselves to be a caring, inclusive school with a positive and welcoming ethos, echoed by our school motto: 'Loving, living and learning together'.

We have a very good track record for supporting children with SEND and have a strong belief in developing the whole child, focusing on personal development as well as academic progress.

Aims

At Basildon CE Primary School we are committed to providing high quality, effective and inclusive education for all children, including those identified as having special educational needs. The aim of this policy is to explain how we provide specific education where required to ensure all children have equal rights and the chance to succeed.

Children may have special educational needs (SEN) either throughout or at any time during their school career. These may be displayed in one or more of the following categories: physical, emotional, behavioural and cognitive. This policy ensures that curriculum planning and assessment for children with SEN takes account of the type and extent of the difficulty experienced by the child.

Objectives

To achieve these aims the school has to:

  • Ensure that the educational needs of children are assessed and identified.
  • Ensure that every child must be able to access all aspects of the curriculum at the appropriate level according to their individual needs and abilities.
  • Create an environment that meets the SEN of each child.
  • Identify the roles and responsibilities of staff in providing for the children’s SEN.
  • Enable all children to have equal and full access to all aspects of the school curriculum and life as far as possible within the resources available.
  • Enable children in the school to work towards promoting a positive self-image and respect for all.
  • Regularly review and evaluate children’s progress and needs, and to work in partnership with parents and children throughout the process.

Educational inclusion

At Basildon CE Primary School we endeavour to create an environment where all children are included, provided for and able to be happy and succeed. Through appropriate curricular provision, we respect and support the fact that children;

  • Have different strategies for learning.
  • Have different educational and behavioural needs and aspirations.
  • Acquire, assimilate and communicate information at different rates.
  • Need a range of different teaching approaches and experiences. 

To allow all children to access high quality learning, we deliver ‘quality first teaching’ to all children in our school. Teachers consistently respond to children’s needs by:

  • Delivering lessons with a range of teaching styles to suit a range of learning styles.
  • Using a range of strategies to meet children’s special educational needs.
  • Planning lessons that have clear learning objectives, tracked back and forward when required, setting appropriately differentiated tasks, and assessing effectively to inform the next stage of learning.

Who to contact

Telephone
01491 671445
E-mail
office@basildonprimary.org.uk
Website
Basildon C.E. (VC) Primary School

Where to go

Address
School Lane
Upper Basildon
Reading
Berkshire
Postcode
RG8 8PD

Time / Date Details

When is it on
Term Time
Time of day
Afternoon
Morning
Lunchtime

Other Details

Availability

Age Ranges
4-11

Local Offer

Description

Basildon CE Primary School is a small village school in West Berkshire, near the border of Berkshire and Oxfordshire. We are a happy and thriving school with 5 classes and around 140 pupils aged 4-11. We consider ourselves to be a caring, inclusive school with a positive and welcoming ethos, echoed by our school motto: 'Loving, living and learning together'.

We have a very good track record for supporting children with SEND and have a strong belief in developing the whole child, focusing on personal development as well as academic progress.

Aims

At Basildon CE Primary School we are committed to providing high quality, effective and inclusive education for all children, including those identified as having special educational needs. The aim of this policy is to explain how we provide specific education where required to ensure all children have equal rights and the chance to succeed.

Children may have special educational needs (SEN) either throughout or at any time during their school career. These may be displayed in one or more of the following categories: physical, emotional, behavioural and cognitive. This policy ensures that curriculum planning and assessment for children with SEN takes account of the type and extent of the difficulty experienced by the child.

Objectives

To achieve these aims the school has to:

  • Ensure that the educational needs of children are assessed and identified.
  • Ensure that every child must be able to access all aspects of the curriculum at the appropriate level according to their individual needs and abilities.
  • Create an environment that meets the SEN of each child.
  • Identify the roles and responsibilities of staff in providing for the children’s SEN.
  • Enable all children to have equal and full access to all aspects of the school curriculum and life as far as possible within the resources available.
  • Enable children in the school to work towards promoting a positive self-image and respect for all.
  • Regularly review and evaluate children’s progress and needs, and to work in partnership with parents and children throughout the process.

Educational inclusion

At Basildon CE Primary School we endeavour to create an environment where all children are included, provided for and able to be happy and succeed. Through appropriate curricular provision, we respect and support the fact that children;

  • Have different strategies for learning.
  • Have different educational and behavioural needs and aspirations.
  • Acquire, assimilate and communicate information at different rates.
  • Need a range of different teaching approaches and experiences. 

To allow all children to access high quality learning, we deliver ‘quality first teaching’ to all children in our school. Teachers consistently respond to children’s needs by:

  • Delivering lessons with a range of teaching styles to suit a range of learning styles.
  • Using a range of strategies to meet children’s special educational needs.
  • Planning lessons that have clear learning objectives, tracked back and forward when required, setting appropriately differentiated tasks, and assessing effectively to inform the next stage of learning.
Local Offer Age Bands
5 to 7
7 to 11

Mainstream

1. Identification of SEND
1.1: How does the school identify children/young people with special educational needs and disabilities?

We will identify children as having a special educational need if they have a significantly greater difficulty in learning than the majority of others of the same age, or if they have a disability which prevents or hinders them from making use of educational facilities that would normally be provided for others of the same age. These criteria are as set out in the definitions of the Special Educational Needs Code of Practice.

Children will generally be identified in one of two ways; through notification from another school, setting or professional when they join the school, or through high quality, regular assessments and observations made by teachers based on the above criteria, which are then collated on to a ‘concern form’.

In both cases, the SENCo is informed and following further assessment, both in school and through other professionals, a decision will be made on whether the child should be placed on to our special educational needs register.

If the child is placed on the register then parents will be informed and together the parents, class teacher and SENCO work together to plan a personalised education support programme.

1.2: What should I do if I think my child has SEND?

If you have any concerns about your child and whether they may have SEND, then your first port of call should be the class teacher for children already in the school, or the head teacher for parents/children new to the school. Following these initial discussions, the class teacher or head teacher will then pass this information on to the SENCo who will begin reviewing the concerns and making assessments as needed.

2. Support for children with special educational needs
2.1: If my child is identified as having SEND, who will oversee and plan their education programme?

When a child is placed on the SEN register, their personalised education programme (known as a ‘SAP’ – ‘Support and Achievement Plan’) will be overseen by their class teacher. The class teacher will ensure that the child's additional needs or requirements are being met in all aspects of their school day (including playtimes, lunchtimes and before or after school provision) and that they are able to access the school curriculum as much as is possible.

In conjunction with the SENCo, the teacher will set up interventions if needed, with the aim of helping the child make accelerated progress. These interventions will be led by well-trained support staff and the teacher will regularly discuss the areas of focus for the child. The SENCO will have the overall responsibility for overseeing and monitoring the quality of the interventions and general provision for the child.

2.2: How will I be informed / consulted about the ways in which my child is being supported?

Parents will have a regular opportunity to meet with their child's class teacher and discuss progress and support. Once every long term (Autumn, Spring or Summer), there will be an opportunity to meet with the teacher to discuss and review the personalised programme in place for them. During this review the 'outcomes' specified in their plan will be looked at and set out for the term ahead.

 Alongside this, there are parents evening meetings in the Autumn and Spring term, as well as the 'open door' ethos we have that encourages regular, informal contact between all parents and their child's class teacher.

2.3: How will the school balance my child's need for support with developing their independence?

This is something that we see as crucial part of a child's development and we structure our balance of support and independence differently for each child, based on their needs. We provide children with the extra support of teaching assistants but structure this so that they do not over-rely on this support. We build in routines, resources and activities that allow and support children in becoming more independent in their learning, friendships and everyday life in school. We feel that independence is a vital life skill and work to help all children develop their independence as much as possible.

2.4: How will the school match / differentiate the curriculum for my child's needs?

Our teachers work hard to plan and deliver lessons that are differentiated in such a way that every child in the class is able to access the curriculum, complete activities and learn as independently as possible. This may take the form of differentiated work, activities, outcomes, resources or support. For children with SEN, teachers ensure that they adapt these things to best suit the child's individual needs. For those children with more severe learning needs, the outcomes and expectations used will be appropriate to the child’s stage of development.

2.5: What teaching strategies does the school use for children with learning difficulties, including autistic spectrum disorder, hearing impairment, visual impairment, speech and language difficulties?

Teachers use a wide variety of strategies in their teaching and classroom management, aimed to involve all children fully in their learning. As stated above, specific strategies or methods will be personalised for our SEND children, based on their individual needs. The following is a small selection of the approaches teachers may use with SEND children in their classes: activities and teaching methods for different learning styles (such as visual, aural and kinaesthetic), differentiation, strategically placed support staff, visual aids, concrete/physical materials, seating positions within the class, visual timetables, social groupings, peer mentoring or support, individualised targets or reward systems for learning, focus or behaviour, and specific, additional interventions as necessary.

2.6: What additional staffing does the school provide from its own budget for children with SEND?

Every class benefits from having learning support assistants (LSAs) working alongside the teacher and children for some, if not all of the week, as standard practice. When a child has SEN they may also receive further support from our LSAs, in the form of classroom support, group/individual interventions or ELSA sessions with a qualified ELSA (Emotional Literacy Support Assistant). The form of this extra support is always personalised for each child's individual needs and will be arranged by the class teacher and SENCo/Headteacher.

The following list of interventions details the additional programmes we put into place for children with SEND. These are a mixture of 'formal' programmes and our own bespoke interventions aimed towards the individual needs we identify through our rigorous assessments. Each intervention programme follows a 'plan, do, assess, review' cycle to ensure it is having the biggest impact possible on a child's progress.

2.7: What specific intervention programmes does the school offer to children with SEND and are these delivered on a one to one basis or in small groups?
Type / TitleIntervention Type
SNAP on 2 maths (booster maths skills, filling gaps in knowledge and understanding) One to one
ELSA (emotional literacy support) One to one
Precision spelling One to one
Booster phonics One to one
Writestart handwriting practise Small group
Touch typing skills intervention Small group
Numicon (maths) One to one
Story telling group (developing understanding of structure of stories and ability to retell and invent stories orally) Small group
Reading comprehension booster sessions (Stile) Small group
FFT/SPRINT One to one
Scribing One to one
Focused Maths Interventions One to one
Speech and Language Support (using input from speech and language therapists) One to one
Motor skills interventions Small group
Focused English Interventions One to one
Physiotherapy support (using guidance from specialist physiotherapists) One to one
LAL centre follow up work One to one
2.8: What resources and equipment does the school provide for children with SEND?

We offer a wide range of resources and equipment to support children's learning and development, which are again selected based on their individual needs. The following are a small selection of the resources and equipment that may be used with children with SEND: visual aids, wordmats, physical resources for maths, numicon, technology such as laptops or chrome books, writing slopes, physiotherapy resources, resources to support motor control, resources to support concentration or focus, coloured resources to support dyslexia, games and specialised dictionaries.

2.9: What special arrangements can be made for my child when taking examinations?

When children with SEND need special arrangements for taking examinations (for example: for any end of key stage tests), then we will follow the guidelines and application process set out by the government.

3. My child's progress
3.1: How will the school monitor my child's progress and how will I be involved in this?

Teachers are continuously assessing pupil progress and use this information to influence subsequent planning and learning in class. They record these assessments and data regularly and these are reviewed by a range of people, including teachers, subject leaders, the SENCo, the headteacher and the governing body.

Teachers also regularly review the individual plans (SAPs) put in place for children with SEND and officially review them 3 times a year to allow outcomes and targets to be refreshed as needed.

Parents are regularly included in the conversations around their child's progress, including through parents evenings, education programme reviews, reports and informal discussions with teachers.

3.2: When my child's progress is being reviewed, how will new targets be set and how will I be involved?

At each review point in the cycle of the individual plans, the teacher (and SENCo if appropriate) will assess the child's progress towards meeting their set outcomes, including the arrangements, interventions and strategies that have been in place to help the child achieve them.

Following this, the teacher (and any other staff or professionals that have supported the child) will form suggested outcomes for the next term. These may be new, continued or adapted outcomes, based on the child's needs.

When you meet with the teacher to review the plan, you have the opportunity to share your views on the child's progress and suggested outcomes for the next term. Together, you and the teacher agree these outcomes and the plan is finalised.

3.3: ln addition to the school's normal reporting arrangements, what opportunities will there be for me to discuss my child's progress with school staff?

Parents have the opportunity to regularly keep in touch with their child's class teacher, through informal discussions. If parents wish to, they can request to meet with other school staff, such as the SENCo or headteacher, at convenient times for all parties.

3.4: What arrangements does the school have for regular home to school contact?

Our arrangements for regular home to school contact are flexible and depend entirely on the preferred methods for the children, parents and teacher. Currently, we use methods for communication such as: face to face discussions and conversations, phone calls, home-school books and emailing.

3.5: How can I help support my child's learning?

Your child's individual plan will detail outcomes for your child's learning, and will include ways that you can support this at home. You can ask advice from the class teacher at any time for ideas of ways to support your child's learning generally, as well as specifically for their targets.

As a school, we regularly hold events for all parents covering aspects of the curriculum and learning (such as reading development or the maths curriculum) that are focused on developing their understanding of how their children learn and how they can support them.

3.6: Does the school offer any help for parents / carers to enable them to support their child's learning, eg. training or learning events?

As a school, we try to hold termly events for all parents covering aspects of the curriculum and learning (such as reading development or the maths curriculum) that are focused on developing their understanding of how their children learn and how they can support them.

In addition to this, we can provide parents with information of local organisations set up to support parents, such as family support workers, parent partnership or local children's centres. When we receive information from the local authority regarding support or training for parents of children with SEND, we pass this information on to the appropriate families.

3.7: How will my child's views be sought about the help they are getting and the progress they are making?

Children will get the chance to regularly share their voice about the effectiveness of the resources used to support their learning and interventions they take part in. They will be aware of the outcomes on their plan and know what they are working towards, how this will happen and their role in this.

Children will be asked to share their views through questionnaires, discussions, drawings or other suitable methods. The methods used will depend on the child.

The level and form of the pupil voice will obviously depend on the age of the child and we expect the pupil to take an increasing role as they move through the school.

3.8: What accredited and non accredited courses do you offer for young people with SEND?

Not applicable.

3.9: How does the school assess the overall effectiveness of its SEN provision and how can parents / carers and young people take part in this evaluation?

At the start of the year, the SENCo creates an action plan for how SEN will be led throughout the school, which is reviewed at key points over the year. In addition to this, the SENCo reviews the progress of children on the SEN register at the end of each long term and presents this information, along with any thoughts, actions or questions to both the headteacher and the governing body.

Children and parents also have an opportunity to take part with this through the reviews of the children's individual plans and through parent forums and yearly parent questionnaires. Children will get the chance to regularly share their voice about the effectiveness of the resources used to support their learning and interventions they take part in. The level and form of the pupil voice will obviously depend on the age of the child and we expect the pupil to take an increasing role as they move through the school.

4. Support for my childs overall well being
4.1: What support is available to promote the emotional and social development of children with SEND?

The emotional wellbeing of every child is incredibly important to us and we have worked to offer a wide range of support for all needs.

Classes teach regular sessions that relate to areas of social and emotional development, including PSHE lessons, circle times, 'R-Time' (sessions that promote good relationships and inter-personal skills), assemblies and group work activities. Each year we have curriculum focus weeks dedicated to 'wellbeing', during which classes look at things such as e-safety, anti-bullying and team building.

Aside from all of these strategies, we subscribe to the ‘Emotional Health Academy’ and benefit from a weekly visit from an ‘Emotional Health Worker’ who liaises with parents, staff and works with children needing specialised emotional support. We also have a trained ELSA (emotional and social support assistant) who works with children in confidential 1 to 1 weekly sessions, working on areas of emotional and social development that have been individually identified. Alongside this we use social stories with children to help them understand different social situations that they may be having difficulty with.

4.2: What support does the school put in place for children who find it difficult to conform to normal behavioural expectations and how do you support children to avoid exclusion?

We employ a wide range of behaviour strategies to manage the behaviour of all pupils and generally have very few problems with behaviour. Please see our behaviour policy for further details.

However, in the situation where a child was finding it difficult to conform we would, in the first instance, discuss this with parents and together aim for a solution. We feel that a consistent approach towards behaviour at both home and school helps children feel secure in their boundaries.

If needed, we also have the support of the Emotional Health Academy, who can provide advice, strategies, resources and support as needed in each individual case.

4.3: What medical support is available in the school for children with SEND?

We look at the medical needs (if any) of each child individually and base our support on these needs. Our staff receive regular first aid training and we have a very competent team of first aiders. Staff are also trained appropriately for each medical need over and above general first aid (such as for administering asthma medicine or auto-injector pens for anaphylaxis).

4.4: How does the school manage the administration of medicines?

Our school policies will outline the full protocol for this, but parents need to inform the office of any medicines their child may need and how they need to be administered; there is a form to complete when you do this.

The medicines are stored correctly and securely in school and staff will ensure that they are administered correctly. We will also check to ensure that the medicines are in date.

4.5: How does the school provide help with personal care where this is needed, eg. help with toileting, eating etc?

We provide support for needs such as these on an individual case basis, and will work as a team to sensitively and appropriately support children to manage their personal care as independently as possible.

5. Specialist services available / accessed by the school
5.1: What SEN support services does the school use, eg. specialist support teachers, educational psychologists, teachers for hearing impairment and visual impairment, ASD advisory teachers, behaviour support teachers etc?

We use a wide range of specialist services to support our provision for children with SEND, but the level our links with different services is very dependent on the needs of the children in our school.

The range of services we are currently using include: Cognition and Learning Team, Speech and Language Therapists, Specialist Inclusion Support Service, Educational Psychologists, Emotional Health Academy, ASD advisory team, Physiotherapists, Occupational Therapists and support for children with hearing and visual impairments from the Sensory Consortium Service.

5.2: What should I do if I think my child needs support from one of these services?

If you think your child has a need that requires assessment or support from one of these services, you should share your thoughts and concerns with the class teacher and/or the SENCo. The SENCo will arrange for assessments to take place in school and if they feel that the child is suitable for referral to one of these services, they will arrange this with your knowledge and consent.

5.3: How are speech and language therapy, occupational therapy and physiotherapy services provided?

Each of these services are provided in school using the guidance and support of the specialist services and the professionals who work with the children. Within school, we set up programmes for children to work towards the targets that will be set for them by the professional from the services, using trained staff and appropriate resources.

Children who are of school age (reception class or above) will be able to access speech and language therapy through school.  They will no longer need to attend appointments at community clinics.

We have a named speech and language therapist who provides a flexible, integrated and holistic service to the school.  The therapist will take in to account the learning environments of the children and provide targeted advice and strategies to teaching staff to support the development of speech, language and communication within the school.

The speech and language therapist will work alongside school staff to use a range of approaches within the school, which may involve discussion with school and family, assessment, training and demonstration, advice, direct therapy and/or joint target setting.

Occupational therapy and physiotherapy services are provided as appropriate, based on children’s individual needs. These services are generally provided for children with specific medical needs.

All of these changes support the SEND Reforms in that they enable the wider workforce to support children with special educational needs at every level; resulting in an equitable, accessible and empowering service which allows every child to achieve their full potential.

5.4: What should I do if I think my child needs to be seen by a speech and language therapist, occupational therapist or physiotherapist?

If you think your child has a need that requires assessment or support from one of these services, you should share your thoughts and concerns with the class teacher and/or the SENCo. The SENCo will arrange for assessments to take place in school and if they feel that the child is suitable for referral to one of these services, they will arrange this with your knowledge and consent.

5.5: What arrangements does the school have for liaison with Children's Social Care services?

In situations where we need to liaise with social care, we will do so through family support workers, 'help for families' and local children's centres, as appropriate. At all times we use the support and advice of the local authority.

6. Training of school staff in SEND
6.1: What SEND training is provided for teachers in your school?

Our SENCo/Inclusion Leader attends regular network meetings and training sessions which is then passed on, as appropriate, to other staff to keep them updated in practice in the area of SEN.

We also have a regular link with a local authority 'Special Needs Support Teacher' (from the Cognition and Learning Team), who advises the SENCo and also provides training for the SENCo and other staff in school.

Teachers receive regular training and support in methods of teaching and learning that support and develop all children, but when there are requirements for additional training based on SEN needs within a class, the school endeavour to provide the best training and support for teachers possible.

6.2: What SEND training is provided for teaching assistants and other staff in your school?

We endeavour to provide LSAs with regular training in methods of supporting the learning of all children, but when there are requirements for additional training based on SEN needs within a class, the school will arrange training for the teaching assistants who will work with the child or run interventions that they will take part in.

6.3: Do teachers have any specific qualifications in SEND?

Our SENCO/Inclusion Leader holds the required 'National SENCO Award', awarded by Reading University.

6.4: Do teaching assistants have any specific qualifications in SEND?

We have an LSA who is a qualified ELSA (Emotional Literacy Support Assistant) and another LSA who holds qualifications in speech and language support, including a level 3 'Elklan Speech and Language Support for 5-11', Makaton foundation and a CACHE Level 3 diploma for children and young person workforce, which covers communication, speech and language, supporting disabled children and those with special needs.

7. Activities outside the classroom including school trips
7.1: How do you ensure children with SEND can be included in out of school activities and trips?

When planning an out of school trip (including any residential trips), teachers carefully consider how children with SEND will be included and any additional support that may be required. These considerations form part of the risk assessments that are carried out before any school trip.

Any additional support or adaptations will be personalised to children's needs, and may include provisions such as extra adult support, reduced time or adapted activities and resources. Parents have, on some occasions (particularly before residential visits), visited sites beforehand to familiarise their children with the settings.

7.2: How do you involve parents / carers in planning the support required for their child to access activities and trips?

Each trip will be carefully considered with regards to the planning and support needed for children with SEND, and parents will be involved when appropriate. We will keep parents informed of our trips and how their children will take part in these as fully as possible.

8. Accessibility of the school environment
8.1: How accessible is the building for children with mobility difficulties / wheelchair users?

We are very lucky in that our school is on a flat, easily accessible site. Every classroom can be accessed easily. Where there are steps or uneven surfaces, we have worked to limit the impact of this on children that may have mobility issues or those that use wheelchairs. The layout of the classrooms and corridors are as such that children with additional needs can still access them. If a child came into a class with additional needs such as these, the class teacher and SENCo would work together, with the parents, to ensure the setting was suitable and inclusive for the child.

8.2: Have adaptations / improvements been made to the auditory and visual environment?

We make adaptations and improvements to our school environment when these are appropriate to the needs of the children in our school. We have made adaptations such as painting high-visibility markings on uneven surfaces (such as ramps) or steps, and lowering ceiling heights for a hearing-impaired child. All of our classrooms have interactive whiteboards as standard which support hearing and visual impairments. All children in the school with hearing or visual impairments are visited regularly by professionals from the appropriate services to assess how they are accessing their environment and then meet with staff to suggest ways that this can be improved further to benefit the child.

8.3: Are there accessible changing and toilet facilities?

Yes, all children, including those with any mobility needs, have access to toilets and changing facilities. The youngest children have toilets attached to their classrooms, and these are designed for children of this age. There are also wider cubicles with hand rails too.

8.4: How do you ensure that all the school's facilities can be accessed by children with SEND?

When children with additional access needs join a class or move into a class, we fully assess the room and adjoining facilities to ensure that it is as inclusive as possible for the child. The class teacher and/or SENCo will carry out a 'learning walk', assessing the environment from the child's perspective. Everyday routines will also be assessed and considered. We will also endeavour to involve the parents in these conversations and activities, particularly if the child is new to the school.

The room layout or organisation may be adjusted, and things such as where a child's peg or tray are will be considered. Our overall aim is to give children the chance to be as independent in their school life as possible.

8.5: How does the school communicate with parents / carers who have a disability?

We are keen to include and communicate with all parents in a way that suits them, so if a family has any specific needs (such as a disability), we will liaise with them to arrange their preferred methods of contact.

8.6: How does the school communicate with parents / carers whose first language is not English?

We are keen to include and communicate with all parents in a way that suits them, so if any parents or carers have a native language that is not English, we will liaise with them to arrange their preferred methods/language of contact.

9. Preparing my child to join a new school / next stage of education
9.1: What preparation will there be for both the school and my child before he or she joins the school?

Each situation will be different and the transition process for each child will therefore reflect this.

Generally, when any new child joins the school the parents have the initial contact with the head teacher and discuss the child's transition into the school. Where there is an identified need, the SENCo is also involved and a plan will be formed that suits and supports that child.

We encourage children to visit the school and spend time in their new classroom, or with their new class. We have such lovely, welcoming children that this always proves to be a positive experience for the new child. This visit (or visits if needed) provides us with the opportunity to get to know the child and begin to make preparations for them if needed. We can also, if appropriate, create transition books with photos of the new classroom and staff for the child to refer to before they start school with us.

We also have good links with our attached nursery (and other local nursery or pre-school settings) and liaise with them to support transition, particularly if there is an identified need. These children get the opportunity to visit their new classroom regularly in the summer term.

9.2: How will my child be prepared to move on to the next stage within school, e.g. class or key stage?

Our children are in the fortunate position that, being a small school, the children know all staff well. Before the end of the academic year, classes spend a morning in their new classroom, with their new teacher to help familiarise and excite them about their next year in school. For some of our SEN children, this may not be enough time, so in these cases we make individual adjustments. We may also create transition books with photos of the new setting and staff for the child to refer to over the summer break. When we do have these individualised transitions, we communicate with and involve parents so that they can support their child.

Teachers will also communicate with each other closely and regularly to ensure that new teachers are fully informed of the needs of the children in their new class.

9.3: How will my child be prepared to move on to his or her next school?

When our children with SEND are preparing to move on to another school (for example at the end of Year 6), we organise personalised transitions for them, aiming to ease their fears or worries, helping them to look forward to going to their new school and helping them enjoy the rest of their time with us.

Each transition is different, but generally they can include some of the following: regular discussions with the child about the transition, visits to the new school (with a known member staff if wanted), the chance to meet new teachers, the creation of transition books with photos of the new setting and staff for the child to refer to, and the merging of systems and strategies used by the new school so the child can get used to them and doesn't have a sudden change. We can also put interventions in place for children who we feel need support in building their skills and confidence to be ‘secondary ready’.

9.4: How will you support a new school to prepare for my child?

We liaise and work with the schools we know our children are moving on to, and the level of this liaison will depend on how much support each transition will need. We contact new schools to discuss and arrange the transition process so that this works for both schools and, most importantly, the child. We will inform the new school of how the child is currently supported so that they can replicate elements of this if needed.

Throughout the transition process, the contacts at school (usually the SENCos) will continue to discuss and evaluate the transition, ensuring that it is positive for the child.

9.5: What information will be provided to my child's new school?

When any child leaves our school, we pass on general information to their new school about the child, their progress and achievement. For any of our children on the SEN register, we will also pass on information about their current targets, education plans, intervention programmes, the level of support they receive and general information about how the new school can best support the child (such as routines, strategies and resources that work well with the child).

9.6: How will the school prepare my child for the transition to further education or employment?

Not applicable

10. Who can I contact to discuss my child?
10.1: Who would be my first point of contact if I want to discuss something about my child or if I am worried?

Your first point of contact when wishing to discuss something about your child will always be their class teacher. However, if this is not possible or appropriate, then you should contact either the SENCo or Headteacher.

10.2: Does the school offer any specific support for parents / carers and families (such as Family Support Workers?)

As a school, we provide information about organisations and help develop links with groups such as 'parent partnership', ‘parent voice’, children's centres or family support workers.

10.3: What arrangements does the school have for signposting parents / carers to external agencies which can offer support, such as voluntary agencies?

We work closely with the parents of children with SEND in our school and will inform them of different organisations that could offer them support or guidance through a range of methods; including face to face conversations, emails, letters and leaflets or posters. Similarly, if parents know of a useful organisation, we encourage them to share this with us so that we might be able to share this with other parents it could benefit.

10.4: What arrangements does the school have for feedback from parents, including compliments and complaints?

As a school, we are proud of our 'open door' ethos and encourage parents to keep in contact with us regularly, especially if they have any questions or concerns. Parents should initially share any feedback with the class teacher, but if this is not sufficient they can then contact the SENCo or head teacher to resolve any conflicts or complaints. Further information on our school complaints policy and procedure can be found on our school website: http://www.basildonprimary.org.uk/information/school-policies/.

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