Pangbourne Primary School

Coronavirus status: CLOSED

Pangbourne Primary School encourages everyone to become life-long learners, respect each other and to "REACH for their star."

Pangbourne Primary School caters for 224 boys and girls aged between three and eleven years on a spacious site on the eastern edge of the village. Our Early Years Foundation Stage provides a well-planned and stimulating curriculum for pupils between the ages of three and five. We currently have two Key Stage 1 classes and four Key Stage 2 classes. Classes are taught as single year groups.  We have qualified teachers responsible for every class and a general teaching assistant allocated to each class every morning for general support.   Teaching assistants also provide specific intervention for individual children or groups of children who require additional support in the mornings and afternoons. This provision is regularly monitored and reviewed.

Pangbourne Primary School provides a broad and balanced curriculum for all children to meet the specific needs of individuals and groups of children. When planning, teachers set suitable learning challenges and respond to children’s diverse learning needs. Teachers take into account the requirements of children who might have barriers to learning and support individuals or groups of children to ensure they are able to achieve their potential.

Teachers respond to children’s needs by:

  • providing support for children with communication, language and literacy difficulties
  • planning to develop children’s understanding through the use of all available senses and experiences
  • planning for children’s full participation in learning including physical and practical activities
  • helping children to manage behaviour and to take part in learning actively and safely
  • Helping children to manage their emotions, particularly during times of trauma or stress and to take part in learning.
  • Developing their understanding of British values by demonstrating tolerance, mutual respect and personal rights and responsibilities.

Children may have special educational needs either throughout, or at any time during their school career. We ensure that the environment, curriculum planning and assessment meet the requirements of all children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities.

Pangbourne School is an important part of the local community, and we actively seek to work in partnership with you as parents, with governors, with the Friends of Pangbourne Primary School (FOPPS) and other professionals in order to provide the very best education for your children.  

Our Mission Statement

We will ensure that the children at Pangbourne Primary School achieve their potential in all areas of school life and will do all in our power to promote attitudes of mutual respect and responsibility.

We attach high priority to the strong links between school and home and will work hard to promote this all important relationship.

Who to contact

Telephone
0118 984 2315
E-mail
office@pangbourne.w-berks.sch.uk
Website
Pangbourne Primary School

Where to go

Address
Kennedy Drive
Pangbourne
Reading
Berkshire
Postcode
RG8 7LB

Childcare Information

Vacancies

Immediate vacancies
Date updated
11/10/2019
Vacancy range(s)
Vacancy range(s)
PlacesStart AgeEnd Age
10 3 11

Funded Places

Local Offer

Description

Pangbourne Primary School encourages everyone to become life-long learners, respect each other and to "REACH for their star."

Pangbourne Primary School caters for 218 boys and girls aged between three and eleven years on a spacious site on the eastern edge of the village. Our Early Years Foundation Stage provides a well-planned and stimulating curriculum for pupils between the ages of three and five. We currently have two Key Stage 1 classes and four Key Stage 2 classes. Classes are taught as single year groups.  We have qualified teachers responsible for every class and a general teaching assistant allocated to each class every morning for general support.   Teaching assistants also provide specific intervention for individual children or groups of children who require additional support in the mornings and afternoons. This provision is regularly monitored and reviewed.

Pangbourne Primary School provides a broad and balanced curriculum for all children to meet the specific needs of individuals and groups of children. When planning, teachers set suitable learning challenges and respond to children’s diverse learning needs. Teachers take into account the requirements of children who might have barriers to learning and support individuals or groups of children to ensure they are able to achieve their potential.

Teachers respond to children’s needs by:

  • providing support for children with communication, language and literacy difficulties
  • planning to develop children’s understanding through the use of all available senses and experiences
  • planning for children’s full participation in learning including physical and practical activities
  • helping children to manage behaviour and to take part in learning actively and safely
  • Helping children to manage their emotions, particularly during times of trauma or stress and to take part in learning.
  • Developing their understanding of British values by demonstrating tolerance, mutual respect and personal rights and responsibilities.

Children may have special educational needs either throughout, or at any time during their school career. We ensure that the environment, curriculum planning and assessment meet the requirements of all children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities.

Pangbourne School is an important part of the local community, and we actively seek to work in partnership with you as parents, with governors, with the Friends of Pangbourne Primary School (FOPPS) and other professionals in order to provide the very best education for your children.  

Our Mission Statement

We will ensure that the children at Pangbourne Primary School achieve their potential in all areas of school life and will do all in our power to promote attitudes of mutual respect and responsibility.

We attach high priority to the strong links between school and home and will work hard to promote this all important relationship.

Contact Telephone
01189842315
Contact Email
office@pangbourne.w-berks.sch.uk
Local Offer Age Bands
5 to 7
7 to 11

Mainstream

1. Identification of SEND
1.1: How does the school identify children/young people with special educational needs and disabilities?

Every school is required to identify and address the SEND of the pupils that they support.

Pangbourne Primary School

will: 

• use their best endeavours to make sure that a child with SEND gets the support they need – this means doing everything they can to meet children and young people’s SEND

• ensure that children and young people with SEND engage in the activities of the school alongside pupils who do not have SEND   

          • inform parents when they are making special educational provision for a child

We have a designated SENCo who supports class teachers and parents to ensure that we provide the best possible support to ensure that children with SEND have the provision they need. If your child is then identified as not making expected progress, the school will set up a meeting to discuss this with you in more detail and to:

  •  listen to any concerns you may have too
  •  plan any additional support your child may receive
  •  discuss with you any referrals to outside professionals to support your child’s learning
1.2: What should I do if I think my child has SEND?
  • If you have concerns about your child you should speak to your child’s class teacher initially.
  • If you would like further information regarding your child’s progress or support regarding their SEND, or if you feel that your child requires a more in-depth assessment of their SEND, you should speak to the SENCo.
  • If you continue to have concerns about your child, you can speak to the Headteacher.
2. Support for children with special educational needs
2.1: If my child is identified as having SEND, who will oversee and plan their education programme?

The SENCo who is responsible for:

  • Coordinating all the support for children with special educational needs or disabilities (SEND) and developing the school’s SEND Policy/ Information report, to make sure all children get a consistent, high quality response to meeting their needs in school.
  • Ensuring that you are:
    • involved in supporting your child’s learning
    • kept informed about the support your child is getting
    • involved in reviewing how they are progressing
    • Liaising with all the other people who may be coming into school to help to support your child’s learning e.g. Speech and Language Therapy, Educational Psychology, School nurse etc.
    • Updating the school’s SEND register (a system for ensuring all the SEND needs of pupils in this school are known) and making sure that there are records of your child’s progress and needs.
    • Providing specialist support for teachers and support staff in the school so they can help children with SEND in the school achieve the best progress possible.

            Class teacher who is responsible for:

  • Checking on the progress of your child and identifying, planning and delivering any additional help your child may need (this could be things like targeted work or  additional support) and letting the SENCo know as necessary.
  • Tracking progress of additional support provided and measuring the impact of additional support.
  • Writing Support and Achievement plans (SAP), with the support of the SENCo and sharing and reviewing these with parents once each term and planning for the next term.
  • Ensuring that all staff working with your child in school are helped to deliver the planned work/programme for your child, so they can achieve the best possible progress. This may involve the use of additional adults, outside specialist help and specially planned work and resources.
  • Ensuring that the school’s SEND Policy is followed in their classroom and for all the pupils they teach with any SEND.

            Headteacher who is responsible for:

  • The day to day management of all aspects of the school, this includes the support for children with SEND.
  • She will give responsibility to the SENCo and class teachers but is still responsible for ensuring that your child’s needs are met.
  • She must make sure that the Governing Body is kept up to date about any issues in the school relating to SEND.

            Governing Body who is responsible for:

Making sure that the necessary support is made for any child who attends the school who has SEND.

SEN Governor who is responsible for:

Meeting with the SENCo and feeding back information to the full governing body regarding the provision for children with SEND in the school.

2.2: How will I be informed / consulted about the ways in which my child is being supported?

There will be three planned opportunities during the year to meet with the class teacher.  Children with SEND will have a Support and Achievement Plan which will be reviewed at the termly meetings. You will also receive an annual report about your child’s progress. Additional meetings can be set up at the request of the class teacher, SENCO or you as parents to ensure effective communication with regard to support for your child.

2.3: How will the school balance my child's need for support with developing their independence?

The role of teachers and teaching assistants supporting individual children or groups of children is carried out very carefully to ensure that children do not rely too heavily on having adult support. Opportunities are built into the school day to develop independence and confidence.

2.4: How will the school match / differentiate the curriculum for my child's needs?

Class Teachers plan lessons according to the specific needs of all groups of children in their class, and will ensure that your child’s needs are met. Specially trained support staff can adapt the teacher’s planning to support the needs of your child where necessary. Specific resources and strategies will be used to support your child individually and in groups. Planning and teaching will be adapted on a daily basis if needed to meet your child’s learning needs.

2.5: What teaching strategies does the school use for children with learning difficulties, including autistic spectrum disorder, hearing impairment, visual impairment, speech and language difficulties?

The school will ensure that a personalised approach is taken towards all children with SEND and the curriculum will be adapted specifically for the child’s needs. We have staff that have experience and training of working with children with Down syndrome and Cerebral Palsy as well as ASD, Speech and Language difficulties, hearing and visual impairment and learning difficulties. The SENCo will make referrals to outside agencies if the school requires additional support or advice to provide for a child.

2.6: What additional staffing does the school provide from its own budget for children with SEND?
  • The school budget, received from West Berkshire Council, includes money for supporting children with SEND.
  • The Head Teacher decides on the budget for Special Educational Needs and Disabilities in consultation with the school governors, on the basis of needs in the school.
  • The Head Teacher and the SENCo discuss all the information they have about SEND in the school, including:
    • the children getting extra support already
    • the children needing extra support
    • the children who have been identified as not making as much progress as would be expected

They use this information to decide what resources, training and support is needed.

  • All resources/training and support are reviewed regularly and changes made as needed throughout the year.
  • Depending on the needs of individual children in each class, there will be support staff allocated to each class where appropriate.
2.7: What specific intervention programmes does the school offer to children with SEND and are these delivered on a one to one basis or in small groups?
Type / TitleIntervention Type
Structured reading support One to one
Read, Write Inc. phonics
Booster classes: English & Maths year 5/6
Speech Therapy programmes as advised by speech therapists
Sensory Alert programmes e.g. How does my engine run?
Anger Management
SNAP Maths
Circle of Friends
Emotional Literacy support
Acceleread Accelewrite
Precision Teaching
2.8: What resources and equipment does the school provide for children with SEND?

We respond to individual needs, following advice from external professionals where appropriate e.g. writing slope, wobble cushion, work station, practical resources like numicon.

2.9: What special arrangements can be made for my child when taking examinations?

Depending on individual needs, special consideration will be applied to children when doing SATs tests. E.g.  Larger print for children with visual impairment or additional time or breaks will be considered for children who have specific learning difficulties. We also provide readers and scribes where required.

3. My child's progress
3.1: How will the school monitor my child's progress and how will I be involved in this?

Class teacher input via excellent targeted classroom teaching also known as Quality First Teaching.
For your child this would mean:

  • That the teacher has the highest possible expectations for your child and all pupils in their class.
  • The teacher uses  a cycle of ‘assess, plan, do, review’ for all pupils to enable early identification of pupils with SEND and to monitor the progress of those already identified as having SEND
  • That all teaching is based on building on what your child already knows, can do and can understand.
  • Different ways of teaching are in place so that your child is fully involved in learning in class. This may involve using practical resources to facilitate their learning.
  • Specific strategies (which may be suggested by the SENCO or outside staff)  are in place to support your child to learn.
  • Your child’s teacher will have carefully checked on your child’s progress and will have decided that your child has gap in their understanding/learning and needs some extra support to help them make the best possible progress.

Specific group work with a smaller group of children.
This group, often called ‘Intervention group’ by schools, may be for children who are not making expected progress due to a personal need or SEND.

They are run in the classroom or in another quieter area, better suited to your child by a teacher or most often, a Teaching assistant who has had training to run these groups.

If a child has been identified by the class teacher as needing some extra support in school:

  • He/ She will engage in group sessions with specific targets to help him/her to make more progress.
  • A teaching assistant/teacher or outside professional (like a Speech and Language Therapist) will run these small group sessions using the teacher’s plan or a plan from a specific programme.

This type of support is available for any child who has specific gaps in their understanding of a subject/area of learning.

Specialist groups run by outside agencies e.g. Speech and Language therapy, Physiotherapy or Occupational therapy groups or individual support

Sometimes children require specialist support from an outside professional on an individual basis. This could be from a/an

  • Local Authority central services such as the ASD Outreach Team or Sensory Service  (for students with a hearing or visual need)
  • Outside agencies such as the Speech and Language therapy (SALT) Service

For your child this would mean:

  • Your child will have been identified by the class teacher/SENCo (or you will have raised your concerns) as needing more specialist input instead of or in addition to quality first teaching and intervention groups.
  • You will be asked to come to a meeting to discuss your child’s progress and help plan possible ways forward.
  • You may be asked to give your permission for the school to refer your child to a specialist professional e.g. a Speech and Language Therapist or Educational Psychologist. This will help the school and yourself understand your child’s particular needs better and may provide us with ideas to help your child in areas they are finding difficult.
  • The specialist professional might meet with you as well as the class teacher or they might work with your  child to understand their needs and make recommendations, which may include:
  • The school may suggest that your child needs some individual support in school. They will tell you how the support will be used and what strategies will be put in place.
    • Making changes to the way your child is supported in class e.g. some individual support or changing some aspects of teaching to support them better
    • Support to set better targets which will include their specific expertise
    • A group run by school staff under the guidance of the outside professional e.g. a social skills group
    • A group or individual work with outside professional

This type of support is available for children with specific barriers to learning that cannot be overcome through Quality First Teaching and intervention groups.

Specified Individual support

This is usually provided via an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP).This means your child will have been identified by the class teacher/SENCo and outside professionsals, as needing a particularly high level of individual teaching and support, which cannot be provided from the budget available to the school.

This usually means that the child is working approximately 2 years or more behind his/her peers. Their needs are often complex, they will have had difficulties for a long time and they may have a diagnosis of one or more difficulties such as Autism, ADHD or a range of physical difficulties.

Usually your child will also need specialist support in school from a professional outside the school. This may be from:

  • Local Authority central services such as the ASD Outreach Team or Sensory Service (for students with a hearing or visual need)
  • Outside agencies such as the Speech and Language therapy (SALT) Service, Physiotherapist or Occupational therapist. 

For your child this would mean:

  • The school (or you) can request that the Local Authority carry out an EHC (Education and Health Care) assessment of your child’s needs. This is a legal process which, if deemed necessary, sets out the amount of support that would be provided for your child.
  • After the school have sent in the request to the Local Authority (with a lot of information about your child, including some from you), they will decide whether they think your child’s needs (as described in the paperwork provided), seem complex enough to require an EHC assessment. If this is the case they will ask you and all professionals involved with your child, to write a report outlining your child’s needs. If they do not think your child needs this, they will ask the school to continue to support the child from their own budget, using advice from outside professionals. In this instance the Local authority will come to the school to hold a meeting to explain why they decided not to carry out the EHC assessment and to offer other suggestions of how the school could use their budget to support your child.
  • If the EHC assessment is agreed: After the reports have all been sent in the Local Authority will decide if your child’s needs are severe, complex and lifelong and that they need more than £6000 support in school to make good progress. If this is the case they will write an EHC Plan.
  • The Statement or EHC Plan, written by the school, the local authority, the child and parents will outline amount of money the Local authority will provide to top up the school’s budget to support your child and how the support should be used and what strategies must be put in place. It will also have long and short term outcomes for your child.
  • An additional adult may be used to support your child with whole class learning, run individual programmes or run small groups including your child.
3.2: When my child's progress is being reviewed, how will new targets be set and how will I be involved?
  • Children are assessed termly, or more frequently if deemed necessary.
  • Their progress is tracked by the class teacher and the Senior Leadership Team.
  • Progress will be discussed at termly parent meetings and via the annual report.
  • At the termly meetings the Support and Achievement Plan will be discussed and you will be fully involved in discussing the outcomes of the plan.
  • Additional meetings may be set up with the SENCo who will support you and the class teacher when reviewing the SAP and setting new targets.
3.3: ln addition to the school's normal reporting arrangements, what opportunities will there be for me to discuss my child's progress with school staff?

There will be three planned opportunities during the year to meet with the class teacher.  Children with SEND will have a Support and Achievement Plan which will be reviewed at the termly meetings. You will also receive an annual report about your child’s progress. Additional meetings can be set up at the request of the class teacher, SENCO or you as parents to ensure effective communication with regard to support for your child.

3.4: What arrangements does the school have for regular home to school contact?
  • Notes are written between the parents and teacher in the Reading record/homework book.
  • Appointments to meet with the teacher or SENCo can be made via the school office.
  • Where appropriate home/school communication books are set up.
  • Class newsletters are sent out three times a year.
  • Class information is on the website.
3.5: How can I help support my child's learning?

The class teacher will provide information regarding how you can support your child at home.

3.6: Does the school offer any help for parents / carers to enable them to support their child's learning, eg. training or learning events?

The school holds Information Evenings and this information will also be communicated in monthly newsletters from the headteacher, termly class newsletters and on the website. Class teachers will share information at parent evenings or at additional meetings where appropriate. Opportunities for parents, who are interested in attending training to further their knowledge of SEND, will be placed in the notice board near the entrance to the school and copies will be emailed to parents of children with SEND.

3.7: How will my child's views be sought about the help they are getting and the progress they are making?

Children are involved in setting of targets and reviewing their progress. Children are involved in the reviewing of their SAP (Support and Achievement plan), where appropriate. Information gathered is used to inform planning for the SENCo and class teachers.

3.8: What accredited and non accredited courses do you offer for young people with SEND?

N/A

3.9: How does the school assess the overall effectiveness of its SEN provision and how can parents / carers and young people take part in this evaluation?
  • Your child’s progress is continually monitored by his/her class teacher.
  • His/her progress is reviewed formally every term in reading, writing, maths and science.
  • The school uses standardised tests for reading and spelling which provide a reading and spelling age for each child. These tests are carried out termly to measure progress and to inform planning.
  • If your child is in Year 1 and above, but is working significanly below the expectation for their year group, a more sensitive assessment tool is used which shows their level in more detail and will also show smaller but significant steps of progress. The levels are called ‘P levels’.
  • At the end of each key stage (i.e. at the end of year 2 and year 6) all children are required to be formally assessed using Standard Assessment Tests (SATS). This is something the government requires all schools to do and are the results that are published nationally. The SATs are used to support the teacher’s assessment of your child.
  • Children who have SEND will have a SAP which will be reviewed with your involvement, every term and the plan for the next term made.
  • The progress of children with a statement of SEND/ EHC Plan is formally reviewed at an Annual Review with all adults involved with the child’s education.
  • The SENCo will also check that your child is making good progress within any individual work and in any group that they take part in. The staff who provide interventions for children with SEND work under close supervision of the SENCo. Interventions are reviewed each half term to ensure that the child is making progress. If not, the intervention will be adapted or support from outside professionals will be sought.
4. Support for my childs overall well being
4.1: What support is available to promote the emotional and social development of children with SEND?

Class teachers are responsible for the children’s over all wellbeing. This will be supported by teaching assistants who work with the class. Where necessary children may be involved in intervention programmes such as Managing Feelings or have support or advice from outside agencies such as the support teacher for Autism or the Behaviour Support. Some children might attend Mindfulness and Art therapy sessions with qualified professionals during the school day where appropriate. The school has two ELSA (Emotional Literacy Support Assistant), who works with children across the school. If required, a  referral to the Emotional Health Academy can be made.

4.2: What support does the school put in place for children who find it difficult to conform to normal behavioural expectations and how do you support children to avoid exclusion?

We provide support staff to work with children in lessons and at playtimes where appropriate. We also involve the Behaviour Support Team/ Educational Psychologist who assist the school and the parents to implement a Behaviour Support plan to ensure that exclusions are avoided if at all possible. If appropriate the school will seek advice and support from the PRU (Pupil Referral Unit).

4.3: What medical support is available in the school for children with SEND?

The school welcomes the support of professionals such as physiotherapists, nurses and other therapists to come into school to meet the medical needs of children. If a child needs specialist medical care regularly during the week, a private room will be provided. Staff will receive additional training as required for specific medical needs of children. Staff are always very willing and able to undergo additional training if necessary.

4.4: How does the school manage the administration of medicines?

Parents are required to fill in a form at the school office to give permission for staff to administer medicines. Staff are trained to administer Epi-pens and other medications and the necessary documents are filled in with the support of the school nurse to ensure that policies are adhered to. Where needed, personal medical wallets are kept for children who have allergies or medical conditions such as epilepsy.

4.5: How does the school provide help with personal care where this is needed, eg. help with toileting, eating etc?

The school is mindful of individual needs of children and will make arrangements with parents and outside professionals to ensure children’s needs are met.

5. Specialist services available / accessed by the school
5.1: What SEN support services does the school use, eg. specialist support teachers, educational psychologists, teachers for hearing impairment and visual impairment, ASD advisory teachers, behaviour support teachers etc?

The SENCo is responsible for contacting outside professionals to support children with SEND.  We have access to teachers from the Sensory Consortium who support children with hearing and visual impairments. The SENCo will also write letters of support to the GP or paediatrician or other health services when required.  Other professionals who are involved with the school where necessary are:

  • Specialist teacher from Brookfields Special School
  • Behaviour Intervention Team
  • Special needs support teacher from the Cognition and Learning Team
  • Speech & Language Therapist
  • Educational Psychologist
  • CAMHS
  • Emotional Health Academy
  • Occupational Therapist
  • Physiotherapist
  • Sensory Consortium
5.2: What should I do if I think my child needs support from one of these services?

Referrals to these services need to adhere to specific criteria. The criteria differ from service to service. The SENCo will be able to provide you with advice and support.

5.3: How are speech and language therapy, occupational therapy and physiotherapy services provided?

These services can be accessed via your GP or the school. You are also able to self- refer if your child fits the criteria, through CYPIT. The SENCo is able to offer support and advice in this area.

5.4: What should I do if I think my child needs to be seen by a speech and language therapist, occupational therapist or physiotherapist?

Talk to your child’s class teacher or the SENCo or to your GP/ Health Visitor. You can also visit the CYPIT (Children & Young People Integrated Services) website to seek advice

5.5: What arrangements does the school have for liaison with Children's Social Care services?

The Headteacher is the designated person for safeguarding. In the Headteachers absence, the Deputy Headteacher is also trained to liase with Children’s Social care services.

6. Training of school staff in SEND
6.1: What SEND training is provided for teachers in your school?

Specific learning difficulties such as Dyslexia, Dyscalculia, Autism, Speech and Language, Visual impairment, Hearing impairment, Down Syndrome as well as any other training that is required. We regularly carry out audits to ensure that staff are able to offer all of our pupils a high level of support.

6.2: What SEND training is provided for teaching assistants and other staff in your school?

Specific learning difficulties such as Dyslexia ,Dyscalculia, Autism, Speech and language, Visual impairment, hearing impairment, Down Syndrome as well as any other training that is required. We regularly carry out audits to ensure that staff are able to offer all of our pupils a high level of support.

6.3: Do teachers have any specific qualifications in SEND?

The SENCo holds the Post Graduate National Award for Special Educational Needs Coordination.

6.4: Do teaching assistants have any specific qualifications in SEND?

We have a qualified ELSA. The other teaching assistants have all had training to work with children with SEND. They have also had many years of experience of working with children with a range of SEND such as ASD, ADHD,  Down Syndrome, Dyslexia, Dyscalculia as well as behavioural and emotional difficulties. The teaching assistants have all had training for a range of specific learning and physical and emotional difficulties to ensure that we meet the needs of all of our pupils.

7. Activities outside the classroom including school trips
7.1: How do you ensure children with SEND can be included in out of school activities and trips?

The school will carry out risk assessments before the trip and arrangements will be put in place for the inclusion of children with SEND. Careful consideration will be made as to whether additional staff or parents go with the child. All of these decisions are made in consultation with the parents.

 

7.2: How do you involve parents / carers in planning the support required for their child to access activities and trips?

The class teacher or SENCo will always talk to parents/carers about requirements depending on the nature of the trip.

8. Accessibility of the school environment
8.1: How accessible is the building for children with mobility difficulties / wheelchair users?
  • The building is accessible to children with physical disability via ramps and widened doors.
  • We ensure that equipment used is accessible to all children regardless of their needs.
  • After school provision is accessible to all children including those with SEND.
  • Extra- curricular activities are accessible for children with SEND.
8.2: Have adaptations / improvements been made to the auditory and visual environment?

We try to place workstations in quieter areas of the school. Teachers are trained to use equipment such as a Radio Aid or Pen friend to support children with hearing impairments. The school will follow advice from the Sensory Consortium to make provision for children with these impairments to access the curriculum.

8.3: Are there accessible changing and toilet facilities?

There is a toilet which can be accessed by wheelchair users.

8.4: How do you ensure that all the school's facilities can be accessed by children with SEND?

The school has been adapted for wheelchair users.

8.5: How does the school communicate with parents / carers who have a disability?

A disabled parking bay is situated close to the school’s main entrance. We communicate by email or telephone.

8.6: How does the school communicate with parents / carers whose first language is not English?

If necessary, the school will enlist the support of the MTAS team who would support children with EAL.

BSL would provide interpreters if we needed to communicate with parents who have EAL.

9. Preparing my child to join a new school / next stage of education
9.1: What preparation will there be for both the school and my child before he or she joins the school?

Home visits are made before children enter Foundation Stage 1, at 3 years of age.

Visits to the school are welcomed and children coming into the school are encouraged to have transition days before they start, to get to know staff and children.

The head teacher meets with new parents to provide information about the school.  The school will also contact previous settings to find out information to ensure a smooth transition for the child.

Staff in all Key Stages hold meetings in July for parents to attend, to discuss the next phase of education at the school.

9.2: How will my child be prepared to move on to the next stage within school, e.g. class or key stage?

When moving to the next class, a changeover morning takes place in early July. If children find change difficult, a transition booklet will be made for the child. This will include photographs of new staff and the setting so the child becomes familiar with the changes before they move. These booklets are sent home to be shared throughout the holidays. Further transition activities can be arranged if required.

9.3: How will my child be prepared to move on to his or her next school?

We invite staff from the new school to come in to talk to your child. We will visit the new setting with your child if appropriate.

9.4: How will you support a new school to prepare for my child?

We set up meetings with the new school, parents and the current teacher as well as the SENCo to ensure a smooth transition. If a child is has an EHCP, the SENCo will invite the SENCo of the new school to attend the Annual review.

9.5: What information will be provided to my child's new school?

The school passes on all academic and personal information to the next school to ensure a smooth transition and to provide continuity for the child.

9.6: How will the school prepare my child for the transition to further education or employment?

N/A

10. Who can I contact to discuss my child?
10.1: Who would be my first point of contact if I want to discuss something about my child or if I am worried?

The class teacher is the first point of call. After that, you may talk to the Key Stage Team Leader or the SENCo.

The SENCo is MrsTania Sutton. If you wish to contact her please telephone the school office or by email: tsutton@pangbourne.w-berks.sch.uk

 

 

10.2: Does the school offer any specific support for parents / carers and families (such as Family Support Workers?)

 The school can contact different organisations to offer support to parents including the ' Family advisor for pupils diagnosed with ASD' or 'Parenting Special Children'.

10.3: What arrangements does the school have for signposting parents / carers to external agencies which can offer support, such as voluntary agencies?

The SENCo is able to provide information for parents. Information may also be emailed out where appropriate.

10.4: What arrangements does the school have for feedback from parents, including compliments and complaints?

We welcome feedback which can be sent by email through the school office or directly to staff where appropriate.  There is a Parent Focus group who meet once a term with the Deputy Headteacher. This group is made up of a representative parent from each class.  At this meeting, the reps are given the opportunity to ask questions, share what is going well and to give feedback on areas they feel may need development. We also send out Parent Surveys to gain valuable feedback. There is also a complaints procedure which can be followed if a parent wishes.

West Berkshire Council do not promote or endorse any of the services listed in this Directory. For more information on this please read our disclaimer.

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