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Fitness advice for wheelchair users

As a wheelchair user, getting active will bring you important health benefits and can help you manage daily life, too. Regular aerobic exercise - the kind that raises your heart rate and causes you to break a sweat - and muscle-strengthening exercise are just as…

Gay health: the issues

If you're gay, lesbian or bisexual, by being aware of your health risks and having relevant health checks, you can stay healthy and reduce your risk of illness. Gay men, lesbians and bisexual people have the same health needs as straight people. However, research shows that…

Get active for mental wellbeing

Being active is great for your physical health and fitness, and evidence shows that it can also improve your mental wellbeing. We think that the mind and body are separate. But what you do with your body can have a powerful effect on your mental…

Going to work after mental health issues

If you've had a mental health problem and been off or out of work, you may worry about going back. You may be concerned about how your colleagues will react, for example, or that you won't be able to cope. But most people find that…

Health for the homeless

'Maria' started taking drugs just at the weekends, but her habit grew until she was spending all her wages on drugs. Eventually she lost her job and her flat. She slept in parks and churchyards, and her health deteriorated. Maria's story is not unusual: homelessness…

Is work good for your health?

Work is good for your bank balance but bad for your health, right? Wrong. The characteristics of work - activity, social interaction, identity and status - are proven to be beneficial for our physical and mental health. Recent research shows that people in work tend…

Learning disabilities: Annual Health Checks

People with learning disabilities often have poorer physical and mental health than other people. This doesn't need to be the case. The Annual Health Check scheme is for adults and young people aged 14 or above with learning disabilities who need more health support and who…

Low mood and depression

Difficult events and experiences can leave us in low spirits or cause depression. It could be relationship problems, bereavement, sleep problems, stress at work, bullying, chronic illness or pain. Sometimes it's possible to feel down without there being an obvious reason. What's the difference between low…

Managing suicidal thoughts

Suicide is the act of intentionally taking your own life. Suicidal feelings can range from being preoccupied by abstract thoughts about dying, wishing you were dead, wanting to disappear, or feeling that people would be better off without you, to thinking about methods of suicide,…

Mental health and wellbeing

Looking after our health and wellbeing is really important.  Mental health is just another way to describe our general wellbeing – it’s about how we are thinking, feeling and behaving and it changes daily, weekly and even monthly depending on our mood and feelings. Mental…

Mental health issues if you're gay, lesbian or bisexual

Poor levels of mental health among lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans (LGBT) people have often been linked to experiences of homophobic and transphobic discrimination and bullying. Other factors - such as age, religion, where you live or ethnicity - can add extra complications to an already difficult…

What is an NHS Health Check?

The NHS Health Check is a free check-up of your overall health. It can tell you whether you're at higher risk of getting certain health problems, such as: heart disease diabetes kidney disease stroke If you're over 65, you will also be told the signs…

What is the Mental Capacity Act?

The Mental Capacity Act (MCA) is designed to protect and empower individuals who may lack the mental capacity to make their own decisions about their care and treatment. It is a law that applies to individuals aged 16 and over. Examples of people who may…

Your NHS Health Check guide

What is an NHS Health Check? The NHS Health Check is a sophisticated check of your heart health. Aimed at adults in England aged 40 to 74, it checks your vascular or circulatory health and works out your risk of developing some of the most disabling - but preventable - illnesses. Think of your NHS Health…
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